pseudoscorpion

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Related to Pseudoscorpions: Whip scorpions

pseudoscorpion

(ˌsjuːdəʊˈskɔːpɪən)
n
(Zoology) another name for false scorpion
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pseudoscorpion - small nonvenomous arachnid resembling a tailless scorpion
arachnid, arachnoid - air-breathing arthropods characterized by simple eyes and four pairs of legs
book scorpion, Chelifer cancroides - minute arachnid sometimes found in old papers
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References in periodicals archive ?
and Cacoxylus Beier (Pseudoscorpionida: Chernetidae), two remarkable sexually dimorphic pseudoscorpions from Australia.
In addition, they found other Coleoptera and insects in the orders Lepidoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Homoptera, Hemiptera, Neuroptera, and Collembola as well as spiders, mites, and pseudoscorpions. Setsuda (1995) also reported on 5 species of beetles associated with C.
Del-Claro, "Social parasitism: Emergence of the cuckoo strategy between pseudoscorpions," Behavioral Ecology, vol.
Finally, the spiders emerge alongside scorpions, harvestmen, mites and ticks as well as pseudoscorpions. From here the division is into Araneomorphae and Mygalomorphae and down into a network maze showing the interrelatedness of all spider families.
kentucki from West Virginia (listed in order of importance) were ants, coleopterans, micro-gastropods, spiders, pseudoscorpions, collembolans, mites, and dipterans (Bailey, 1992).
Mahnert & Adis, 2002), the knowledge about ecological and taxonomical diversity of pseudoscorpions is under explored, as well as their relationship with the different habitats.
The effects of varied grazing management on epigeal spiders, harvestmen and pseudoscorpions of Nardus stricta grassland in upland Scotland.
Crustacea dominate as predators (Cheng 1976), while a range of centipedes (Class Chilopoda), symphylids (Class Symphyla), pauropods (Class Pauropoda), millipedes (Class Diplopoda), scorpions (Order Scorpiones), microwhip scorpions (Order Palpigradi), pseudoscorpions (Order Pseudoscorpiones), mites and ticks (Order Acari) and spiders (Order Araneae) have also been recorded as living in the intertidal region worldwide (Roth & Brown 1976).
Other prey, such as hemipterans, lepidopterans, hymenopterans, pseudoscorpions, chilopods, solpugids, thysanurans, odonates, and dipterans, were found in much lower percentages in lizards of both sexes (Table 3).