psychobiography


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psy·cho·bi·og·ra·phy

 (sī′kō-bī-ŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. psy·cho·bi·og·ra·phies
1. A biography that analyzes the psychological makeup, character, or motivations of its subject: "We are given a kind of psychobiography which ultimately pictures a deeply egotistical individual, unable to tolerate anyone else's success" (Leon Botstein).
2. A character analysis.

psy′cho·bi·og′ra·pher n.
psy′cho·bi′o·graph′ic (-bī′ə-grăf′ĭk), psy′cho·bi·o·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

psychobiography

(ˌsaɪkəʊbaɪˈɒɡrəfɪ)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a biography that pays particular attention to a person's psychological development
psychobiographical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

psy•cho•bi•og•ra•phy

(ˌsaɪ koʊ baɪˈɒg rə fi, -bi-)

n., pl. -phies.
a biography that stresses childhood trauma and unconscious motives of the subject.
[1930–35]
psy`cho•bi•og′ra•pher, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Since Perry demonstrated "neither sensitivity to nor knowledge about complex black cultural beliefs regarding gender and sexual difference" (58), Dyson dismissed the former's psychobiography of Malcolm.
In his extensive psychobiography of Hitler, for example, Fromm identifies the infamous "mad streak" of his analysand, but concludes that "Hitler was sane enough to pursue his aims purposefully and--for a while--successfully" (Fromm 1984 [1973]:572).
But it is another branch of the "family tree" that I want to explore here, one that will tell us as much as will any psychobiography about the work's foundations.
"Psychobiography in politics is ordinarily a mug's game," New Yorker editor David Remnick begins his signed editorial on Benjamin Netanyahu this week, and yet few American observers are more qualified in the prime minister's case: Remnick's 1998 profile (unfortunately subscription-only), is insightful and superbly written, and is particularly acute on the anxiety of influence that Benzion Netanyahu exerts over his son.
As a serious scholar who also wants to get out alive, be largely resists any temptation either to speculate or to create a psychobiography to fill in the gaps.
Rather, I Am Alive is a strange fusion of memoir and psychobiography. Carrere claims that "I have tried to depict the life of Philip K.
In their psychobiography of Truman, Lifton and Mitchell (1995, 129) have judged this rhetoric nuclearist in reflecting "a spiritual faith that the ultimate power of the emerging weapon could serve not only death and destruction but also ...
There are several chapters devoted to psychobiography of Sharon, Arafat, and Bush, which are the weaker parts of the book.
Hilton approvingly echoes Sartre's psychobiography on several points.
He abhorred psychobiography with its wont to be tendentious and simplistic.
But biographers have resolutely stuck to the more appealing and ideologically useful myth, tweaking it to reflect the Zeitgeist, as Charlotte evolved from Victorian moral exemplar to the repressed spinster of early 20thcentury psychobiography to late 20thcentury feminist heroine.