psychodynamics

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Related to psychodynamically: Psychodynamic perspective

psy·cho·dy·nam·ics

 (sī′kō-dī-năm′ĭks, -dĭ-)
n.
1. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) The interaction of various conscious and unconscious mental or emotional processes, especially as they influence personality, behavior, and attitudes.
2. (used with a sing. verb) The study of personality and behavior in terms of such processes.

psy′cho·dy·nam′ic adj.
psy′cho·dy·nam′i·cal·ly adv.

psychodynamics

(ˌsaɪkəʊdaɪˈnæmɪks)
n
(Psychology) (functioning as singular) psychol the study of interacting motives and emotions
ˌpsychodyˈnamic adj
ˌpsychodyˈnamically adv

psy•cho•dy•nam•ics

(ˌsaɪ koʊ daɪˈnæm ɪks)

n.
1. (used with a pl. v.) the conscious and unconscious motivational forces that determine human behavior and attitudes.
2. (used with a sing. v.) any branch of psychology or method of clinical treatment that views personality as the result of an interplay between conscious and unconscious factors.
[1870–75]
psy`cho•dy•nam′ic, adj.
psy`cho•dy•nam′i•cal•ly, adv.

psychodynamics

the systematic study of personality in terms of past and present experiences in relation to motivation. — psychodynamic, adj.
See also: Psychology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.psychodynamics - the interrelation of conscious and unconscious processes and emotions that determine personality and motivation
interrelatedness, interrelation, interrelationship - mutual or reciprocal relation or relatedness; "interrelationships of animal structure and function"
2.psychodynamics - the branch of social psychology that deals with the processes and emotions that determine psychology and motivation
social psychology - the branch of psychology that studies persons and their relationships with others and with groups and with society as a whole
group dynamics - the branch of social psychology that studies the psychodynamics of interaction in social groups
Translations

psychodynamics

[ˌsaikəʊdaɪˈnæmiks] NSINGpsicodinámica f

psychodynamics

n singPsychodynamik f
References in periodicals archive ?
The scientific legacy of Sigmund Freud: Toward a psychodynamically informed psychological science.
Interestingly, hypochondriasis was seen psychodynamically as a defence against guilt or low self-esteem (4), which bears obvious resemblances with the role of self-blame in bereavement (5).
Viewed psychodynamically, these diverse historical accounts of psychoanalyst suicides capture a range of personality and life circumstances including manifestation of physical, psychic, and interpersonal pain.
One of the more consistent forms of therapy in which this medialization is appreciated is psychodynamically oriented psychotherapy.
While participants are asked to think about this exercise in the context of their belief systems or spirituality, psychodynamically this can be understood as a means of fostering access to contents of the psyche which might otherwise be difficult to reach.
Sarnat, a psychologist-psychoanalyst in clinical and supervisory practice, outlines a relational model of supervision in psychodynamically oriented treatments that focuses on what occurs in the supervisory relationship and the conflicts in it and the relationship with patients.
The dream: A psychodynamically informative instrument.
This spontaneous resolution of symptoms could have been because of the psychodynamically oriented multidisciplinary approach to her care, which may have helped her realize that she did not have to "stand alone" as she embarked on motherhood.
Psychodynamically based therapeutic analysis of the family dynamic suggested a conflict between the adolescent and her mother about who had control of the blood sugar levels.
Following important studies about psychotherapy for schizophrenia (Gunderson et al., 1984; May, 1968; Stanton et al., 1984), psychodynamically oriented psychotherapy was deemed to be largely ineffective to treat schizophrenia and related psychoses and to have no beneficial effect on cognitive functioning and interpersonal relationships (Klerman, 1984; Smith et al., 1996).
We must figure out the extent to which an understanding of non-Western practices can enrich our competency as psychodynamically informed therapists working from a Western cultural orientation within Western contexts with client populations representing Western and non-Western cultural orientations.