psychogenesis


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psy·cho·gen·e·sis

 (sī′kə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
1. The origin and development of psychological processes, personality, or behavior.
2. Development of a disorder or illness resulting from psychological rather than physiological factors.

psy′cho·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk) adj.
psy′cho·ge·net′i·cal·ly adv.

psychogenesis

(ˌsaɪkəʊˈdʒɛnɪsɪs)
n
(Psychology) psychol the study of the origin and development of personality, human behaviour, and mental processes. Also called: psychogenetics
psychogenetic, psychogenetical adj
ˌpsychogeˈnetically adv

psy•cho•gen•e•sis

(ˌsaɪ koʊˈdʒɛn ə sɪs)

n.
1. the origin and development of a psychological or behavioral state.
2. the emotional cause of or contribution to symptoms of a disorder.
[1830–40]
psy`cho•ge•net′ic (-dʒəˈnɛt ɪk) adj.

psychogenesis

the appearance of physical symptoms as a result of emotional problems. — psychogenic, psychogenetic, adj.
See also: Disease and Illness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.psychogenesis - the development in the life of an individual of some disorder that is caused by psychological rather than physiological factors
growing, growth, ontogenesis, ontogeny, maturation, development - (biology) the process of an individual organism growing organically; a purely biological unfolding of events involved in an organism changing gradually from a simple to a more complex level; "he proposed an indicator of osseous development in children"
2.psychogenesis - a general term for the origin and development of almost any aspect of the mind
growing, growth, ontogenesis, ontogeny, maturation, development - (biology) the process of an individual organism growing organically; a purely biological unfolding of events involved in an organism changing gradually from a simple to a more complex level; "he proposed an indicator of osseous development in children"
References in periodicals archive ?
The historical exercise as an exercise of power: the Cabinet des chartes and the psychogenesis of French archiving.
(1934); Psychogenesis of manic-depressive states: contributions to psychoanalysis, International Journal of Psychoanaysis, 145-174.
Schleiden addresses the question of individuality in "Contributions to Our Knowledge of Psychogenesis":
Another theoretical point of view regarding reading learning sequence is the so called written language Psychogenesis, which says that the learner makes hypotheses about the code, walking through a pass that can be represented by levels: pre-syllabic, syllabic, syllabic-alphabetical and alphabetical (10).
"The Psychogenesis of a Case of Homosexuality in a Woman." Collected Papers.
1) That the boundary between the mentally well and the mentally ill is fluid because normal persons can become ill if exposed to severe enough trauma, 2) that mental illness is conceived along a continuum of severity--from neurosis to borderline conditions to psychosis, 3) that the untoward mixture of noxious environment and psychic conflict causes mental illness, and 4) that the mechanisms by which mental illness emerges in the individual are psychologically mediated (known as the principle of psychogenesis).
Melanie Klein explores the fantasy of omnipotence at length in her essay, "The Psychogenesis of Manic-Depressive States." This fantasy is both the prerequisite for the development of social relations and a project doomed to failure, since omniscience can exist only as a fantasy.
Nevertheless, despite these and other differing theoretical approaches concerning the psychogenesis of obsessions and compulsions, the reflective function appears to represent a clinical concept where there is some agreement.
From the oriental downtempo tunes of William Mahfoud's Rise 1969 to a full-on night of psy-trance with psychogenesis, the program promises something for everyone.
He adheres to the theory of civilization of Elias, in which parents act, from a relationship based on equality and horizontality, as modulators of the dominant culture of society adapted to each child (sociogenesis and psychogenesis).
What is at stake, as Elizabeth Grosz notes, is "the relative stabilization of the circulation of libido in the child's body, so that the division between subject and object (even the subject's capacity to take itself as an object) becomes possible for the first time." (15) The acquisition of the linguistic "I," while certainly a vast step in development, must be preceded by a more fundamental adaptation: the basic self/other distinction, or, the psychogenesis of self.