psychogeriatrics

(redirected from psychogeriatrician)
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psychogeriatrics

(ˌsaɪkəʊdʒɛrɪˈætrɪks)
n
(Medicine) (functioning as singular) med the branch of health care concerned with the study, diagnosis, and sometimes treatment of mentally disordered older people. Compare geriatrics
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The visit to the unit included a presentation by psychogeriatrician Frans Hoogeveen on "errorless learning", a method used to improve learning capacity in residents with dementia.
The Health Care Complaints Commission sought expert opinion from a consultant psychiatrist and psychogeriatrician, Janine Stevenson, who stated he did nothing to stop the relationship progressing by "letting her spend time in the practice, by letting her work in the practice, by giving her food, money and gifts and by seeking out her advice and support for his own problems".
The weekly half-day clinic is run by two geriatricians, a psychogeriatrician and a neuropsychologist, with access to a hospital nurse, social worker and occupational therapist as needed.
Clinical data was collected at each of the four phases by a Specialist Psychogeriatrician who was not involved in the DCM.
Fox is a psychogeriatrician and director of the Comprehensive Local Research Network for the U.K.
I'll send you my leaflet about depression in old age, and I beg you to go back to your doctor and to be referred either to a psychiatrist or a psychogeriatrician who will know exactly how to alleviate your symptoms.
Frederic Munsch, who was born in 1955 in Mulhouse, is a geriatrician and psychogeriatrician. As a hospital clinician he was head of department at Cernay Hospital from 1987 to 1999 and was a founding member of APVAPA.
Information derived from clinical assessment, neuropsychological assessment, standard laboratory investigations and neuro-imaging were reviewed at a case conference involving a psychogeriatrician, neuropsychiatrist, neuropsychologist, neurologist, psychiatry registrar, occupational therapist and social worker.
Wellington psychogeriatrician Janet Turnbull said health professionals could not cure these disorders, but there were many practical things they could do.