psychographic

(redirected from psychographical)
Also found in: Medical.

psy·cho·graph

 (sī′kə-grăf′)
n.
A graphic representation or chart of the personality traits of an individual or group.

psy′cho·graph′ic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

psychographic

(ˌsaɪkəʊˈɡræfɪk) or

psychographical

adj
(Psychology) psychol relating to psychographics, psychography, or the use of a psychogram
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The first is the already existent, traditionally intensive relations between Slovenia and Germany deriving from historical, psychological and geographical (psychographical) reasons (cf.
cereijo@uta.edu Table 1 Cronbach's Alpha for Methods Online asynchronous .9583 Oncampus classes .9451 V-Tel .9787 Table 2 Chi Square Test for Demographical and Psychographical Variables by Class Format Method Variable Chi-square p-value Work hours 5.692 .017 Gender 1.098 .295 Degree seeking .863 .650 Enrollment type 3.258 .071 Marital 2.690 .101 n.s.
Mandl points out that good radio DJs don't simply play tracks, they create a whole 'psychographical' landscape, moving through different moods and styles to construct a specific aural space.
Literature indicates that marketers' existing understanding of older consumers revolves around their personal characteristics, in terms of socioeconomic, demographical and psychographical data.
Marketers, by and large, use the traditional approach of using demographic, socio-economic, and psychographical variables.
In this paper we develop a comprehensive model that integrates attitudinal, motivational, and psychographical data from customers and combines that with behavioral data to determine the overall impact on interactive relationships.
In this article, we develop a comprehensive donor relationship-building model that integrates attitudinal, motivational, and psychographical data from customers and combines that with behavioral data to determine their overall impact on interactive relationships.
Specifically, little is understood about how psychographical data can be captured and utilized to better define customer relationships, how this understanding can be used to better segment and target financial service offers and communications, and the impact that interactivity might have on maximizing long-term customer value (Berry and Britney, 1996; Donner and Dudley, 1996; Leepak, 1998; Newberger, 1998; Reinbach, 1996; Taylor, 1996).
Since the extensive psychographical data captured via the survey would not be available for all current and/or potential customers, a way was needed to generalize these attitudes to the rest of the bank's database, and eventually, to categorize prospects into the psychographic segments as well.
If we survey those viewer characteristics, we can link their psychographical characteristics, commercial viewing style, and actual product-usage behavior.