psychoid

psychoid

(ˈsaɪkɔɪd)
n
the innate impetus to perform actions
adj
relating to the innate impetus to perform actions
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In this chapter, Driesch briefly outlines a theory of 'my body' as a natural body, its senses, its functions--with several references to the notions of 'entelechy' and 'psychoid' which Driesch had developed in some of his earlier 'vitalist' publications; (29) thereby the 'psychoid' is (simply put) the 'entelechy' in-so-far as it relates specifically to the abovementioned human actions.
Relying on Jung's own words that "collective unconscious describes the psyche which is not perceptible, I call it Psychoid" (436), we can consider Anima as spiritual, everlasting and immortal.
The unconscious also contains psychoid functions that are not capable of consciousness and of which we have only indirect knowledge, such as the relationship between matter and spirit.
These are actually literary symbols, quite different from those of the mind, as what Jung referred to as the pure or "psychoid archetype" is not demonstrable as a representation, or a fixed image, but is instead indicated by a system of images that surround it ("The Structure and Dynamics of the Psyche" par.
Indeed, reading these poems, culled from fourteen of his major books, one senses the poet steadily gliding toward opaque clairvoyance: "World, vague term, Spring, you call to me in your thin psychoid." As they near language's ultima Thule, Zanzotto's later poems, self-described "works adrift" and "uncertain fragments," yahoo toward a precariously private language that incorporates primitive scrawls and playing card icons, reinforcing the point that words themselves belong to a mysterious set of barely decipherable signs always on the brink of vanishing.
Jung did not have the answers, but he perceived synchronicity as neither entirely psychological nor entirely physical, yet occupying a real "psychoid" space in between.
This is the psychoid (37) sphere which precedes and feeds the matrix of the dynamic somatic intentionality articulated by instinctual drives.
Jung termed this speculum between matter and mind as the "psychoid," its integrating factor is meaning.
Mansfield endorses Jung's view that reality is "psychoid" in nature; that is, both the mental and physical realms possess mentalistic properties, and mind and matter are, in fact, one.
They come from what some have called the 'mythopoetic', the 'archetypal' or the 'psychoid' level of the unconscious and they are experienced by the ego as extraordinary, mysterious, awesome, dreadful, or numinous.
Later in his life, Jung wrote of the archetype as being psychoid. By this he meant that one could not determine by introspection whether it was psychical, physical, or both.
These transcendent states are what Carl Jung called numinous experiences which, whether interpreted as pathological or as divine inspirations, derive from an overwhelming breakthrough into consciousness of unconscious material from the 'psychoid' realm where the archetypes reside (Capobianco, 1993).