psychol.

psychol.

abbreviation for
1. (Psychology) psychological
2. (Psychology) psychology
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Eur J Work Organ Psychol. 2011;20(6):805-32, https://doi.org/10.1080/1359432X.
The VA EBP training programs that treat depression, insomnia, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and chronic pain all have published results demonstrating that VA-licensed therapists in EBP training are able to build strong initial alliances with their veteran patients that continue to improve over the course of treatment (average Cohen's d = 0.56) (J Consult Clin Psychol. 2012;80[5];70718); (J Consult Clin Psychcol.
Am Psychol. 2005; 60(3):261-262; discussion 265-267.
PSYCHOL. 482, 482-97 (1995) (suggesting that individuals increased their support for water-conservation decisions when authorities use fair decisionmaking procedures).
Canadian researchers randomly assigned 58 sedentary university women to two groups: All rode a stationary bike for 20 minutes, but half did so in front of a mirrored wall (Health Psychol. 22[4]:354-61, 2003).
Penrod, Increasing Attorney Persuasiveness in the Courtroom, 8 LAW 6, PSYCHOL. REV.
Appl Psychol. 2005;54(1):99-118, http:// dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-0597.2005.00198.x.
Psychol. 2012 [doi: 10.1080/15374416.2012.673162]).
In a large meta-analysis of 175 studies published between 1980 and 2007, Roman Kotov, Ph.D., and his colleagues reported effect sizes greater than 1.0 for neuroticism's impact upon the risk of developing a depressive syndrome, an anxiety syndrome, or a substance use disorder (Psychol. Bull.
Exposure to such graphic content might not only be unsuitable for youngsters, but might promote aggression and other externalizing behavior problems (Psychol. Sci.
Exposure to such graphic content not only might be unsuitable for youngsters, but might promote aggression and other externalizing behavior problems (Psychol. Sci.