psycholinguistics

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psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

 (sī′kō-lĭng-gwĭs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the influence of psychological factors on the development, use, and interpretation of language.

psy′cho·lin′guist n.
psy′cho·lin·guis′tic adj.

psycholinguistics

(ˌsaɪkəʊlɪŋˈɡwɪstɪks)
n
1. (Linguistics) (functioning as singular) the psychology of language, including language acquisition by children, the mental processes underlying adult comprehension and production of speech, language disorders, etc
2. (Psychology) (functioning as singular) the psychology of language, including language acquisition by children, the mental processes underlying adult comprehension and production of speech, language disorders, etc
ˌpsychoˈlinguist n
ˌpsycholinˈguistic adj

psy•cho•lin•guis•tics

(ˌsaɪ koʊ lɪŋˈgwɪs tɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the study of the relationship between language and the cognitive or behavioral characteristics of those who use it.
[1935–40]
psy`cho•lin′guist, n.
psy`cho•lin•guis′tic, adj.

psycholinguistics

the study of the relationships between language and the behavioral mechanisms of its users, especially in language learning by children. — psycholinguist, n. — psycholinguistic, adj.
See also: Linguistics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.psycholinguistics - the branch of cognitive psychology that studies the psychological basis of linguistic competence and performance
cognitive psychology - an approach to psychology that emphasizes internal mental processes
Translations

psycholinguistics

[ˌsaɪkəʊlɪŋˈgwɪstɪks] NSINGpsicolingüística f

psycholinguistics

n singPsycholinguistik f
References in periodicals archive ?
From the perspective of developmental psychologists and psycholinguists, the main question on word acquisition concerns how young children learn words (nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc.
Neurolingists and psycholinguists explore the nature of phonological processing using behavioral measures, computational modeling, electroencephalography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging.
Allen 1978, Lees 1970, Levi 1978, Zimmer 1971) and, primarily, by psycholinguists (Libben to appear, Gagne and Spalding 2014, and many others).
This broad definition tries to include different perspectives, such as the one followed by historical linguists, who define cognates as orthographically identical words that share form and meaning; and psycholinguists, who understand cognates as words with phonological and orthographical similarities and equivalent translation (Otwinowska, 2015: 44).
Later on, the linguists, cognitive psychologists, and psycholinguists put forward the Schema theory, which explained that all knowledge is organized into different units and information is stored within schemas (units of knowledge).
However, as psycholinguists have shown, even silent readers tend to produce inner speech informed by the prosody of sentences (Fodor).
Within Cognitive Linguistics Lakoff and Johnson (1999) have postulated comparable correlations in other domains and psycholinguists like Gibbs (2006; 2011) have provided empirical evidence in favor of experiential correlation leading to the conflation of different concepts in the mind.
In other words, even though I understood what sociolinguists and psycholinguists and others of the sort are concerned with and the ways in which their fields differ; I had not yet adjusted my language to reflect the fact that certain concepts and arguments which to me seemed idiomatic were so politically loaded or nuanced as to be incompatible between disciplines, especially at the level of discourse that I was expected to maintain as an emerging scholar.
These techniques have been used for analyzing a variety of psycholinguists tasks in both healthy and clinical conditions (Cabana, Valle-Lisboa, Elvevag, & Mizraji, 2011; Mota et al.
Her style of reference to "the Paramount" in this instance suggests that she assumes that her audience knows the nightclub at least on the strength of what pragmatics-influenced psycholinguists Herbert H.
To bolster her theory, she draws on psycholinguists who argue that the concrete operations of gestures "precede the acquisition of language, and organize the preverbal semiotic space.