psycholinguistics

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psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

 (sī′kō-lĭng-gwĭs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the influence of psychological factors on the development, use, and interpretation of language.

psy′cho·lin′guist n.
psy′cho·lin·guis′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

psycholinguistics

(ˌsaɪkəʊlɪŋˈɡwɪstɪks)
n
1. (Linguistics) (functioning as singular) the psychology of language, including language acquisition by children, the mental processes underlying adult comprehension and production of speech, language disorders, etc
2. (Psychology) (functioning as singular) the psychology of language, including language acquisition by children, the mental processes underlying adult comprehension and production of speech, language disorders, etc
ˌpsychoˈlinguist n
ˌpsycholinˈguistic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

psy•cho•lin•guis•tics

(ˌsaɪ koʊ lɪŋˈgwɪs tɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the study of the relationship between language and the cognitive or behavioral characteristics of those who use it.
[1935–40]
psy`cho•lin′guist, n.
psy`cho•lin•guis′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

psycholinguistics

the study of the relationships between language and the behavioral mechanisms of its users, especially in language learning by children. — psycholinguist, n. — psycholinguistic, adj.
See also: Linguistics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.psycholinguistics - the branch of cognitive psychology that studies the psychological basis of linguistic competence and performance
cognitive psychology - an approach to psychology that emphasizes internal mental processes
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

psycholinguistics

[ˌsaɪkəʊlɪŋˈgwɪstɪks] NSINGpsicolingüística f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

psycholinguistics

n singPsycholinguistik f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
For many years, psycholinguists, behavior analysts, and animal cognition researchers have investigated processes by which their respective participant populations learn new arbitrary relations without explicit training.
The problem of how word meanings are connected to the appropriate lexical entries has been so complex as to baffle psycholinguists whose models were carefully purged of any possible intrusion from a second language.
Today, psycholinguists like Sam Glucksberg and Boaz Keysar maintain, rather categorically, that"[s]imiles can always be intensified by putting them in metaphor form, whereas the reverse does not hold" (406).
Drawing upon the principles of pragmatic theory, numerous psycholinguists have also been interested in the felicity conditions associated with negative sentences.
Of course different psycholinguists understand this model of the situation in a different way (Leontiev 1997: 107-109): but for everyone this situation is constructed of a system of communicatively important cognitive elements.
These objections, however, can be refuted in turn by other preliminary and factual claims that Jakobson or other psycholinguists might make.
But then again it is precisely the infamously informal use made of informants' judgments by those linguists who do not call themselves experimental psycholinguists that has made those who do question the empirical status of linguistic research (see, e.g., Derwing 1980; Ringen 1980), and making one's informant testing less informal (e.g.
This group was founded in 1987 to provide an informal forum for linguists, psycholinguists, and psychologists to discuss ongoing studies and recent findings in the field of SLI.
Are narrative structures in fact wholly culturally variab le, or do they pertain in some way to a cognitive endowment of the sort hypothesized by linguists and psycholinguists examining the human language faculty?
Neurolinguists and psycholinguists from the US and Europe provide 11 essays in honor of the work of linguist Sheila Blumstein, particularly how speech and language are represented and processed in the brain.
An interesting and fruitful dialogue will then come about between linguists and psycholinguists against the double backdrop of psycholinguistic and linguistic theory formation.