psycholinguistics

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psy·cho·lin·guis·tics

 (sī′kō-lĭng-gwĭs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the influence of psychological factors on the development, use, and interpretation of language.

psy′cho·lin′guist n.
psy′cho·lin·guis′tic adj.

psycholinguistics

(ˌsaɪkəʊlɪŋˈɡwɪstɪks)
n
1. (Linguistics) (functioning as singular) the psychology of language, including language acquisition by children, the mental processes underlying adult comprehension and production of speech, language disorders, etc
2. (Psychology) (functioning as singular) the psychology of language, including language acquisition by children, the mental processes underlying adult comprehension and production of speech, language disorders, etc
ˌpsychoˈlinguist n
ˌpsycholinˈguistic adj

psy•cho•lin•guis•tics

(ˌsaɪ koʊ lɪŋˈgwɪs tɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the study of the relationship between language and the cognitive or behavioral characteristics of those who use it.
[1935–40]
psy`cho•lin′guist, n.
psy`cho•lin•guis′tic, adj.

psycholinguistics

the study of the relationships between language and the behavioral mechanisms of its users, especially in language learning by children. — psycholinguist, n. — psycholinguistic, adj.
See also: Linguistics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.psycholinguistics - the branch of cognitive psychology that studies the psychological basis of linguistic competence and performance
cognitive psychology - an approach to psychology that emphasizes internal mental processes
Translations

psycholinguistics

[ˌsaɪkəʊlɪŋˈgwɪstɪks] NSINGpsicolingüística f

psycholinguistics

n singPsycholinguistik f
References in periodicals archive ?
The identification of the ontogenetic sources for language development is of considerable interest in comparative and developmental psychology (Tomasello 2008), anthropology (Kennealy 2007), biological genetics Fisher and Ridley (2013), and developmental psycholinguists (Crystal 2006).
However, as psycholinguists have shown, even silent readers tend to produce inner speech informed by the prosody of sentences (Fodor).
Her style of reference to "the Paramount" in this instance suggests that she assumes that her audience knows the nightclub at least on the strength of what pragmatics-influenced psycholinguists Herbert H.
The research team included cognitive psychologists, psycholinguists, survey methodologists and computer scientists from both universities, as well as collaborators from AT and T Research.
The semantically implied irregular inflection effect may not have a major impact on the field of cognitive linguistics because it strays too far from traditional methods of research rooted in the ongoing theoretical debate in psycholinguists described at the beginning of this paper.
For psycholinguists, the particular reality that must be constructed piecemeal from data by each language learner is, of course, the grammar of a language.
Psycholinguists (like George Lakoff, who first came to my attention with the book he co-authored with philosopher Mark Johnson, Metaphors We Live By), analyze, among many other things, morphology, syntax, and semantics (which I highlight because of what Hicok does to them), being simply stated, words and the rules that we apply to them (as opposed to phonology which looks at the smallest unit of attention not as words but in terms of sounds themselves); the order of words and the rules of sentence construction; and how we take meaning out of the words and sentences we constructed by all those rules and what the rules of meaning-making are.
This glossary can be used by linguists, psycholinguists, sociolinguists, students of linguistics, EFL learners, and scholars interested in conducting research in the field of language acquisition.
He comments that in so doing he 'traversed some fascinating territories of the mind--philosophical logic, linguistics, psycholinguists, psychology, neuroscience, neuro-psychology, anthropology, theology, ethics, metaphysics, phenomenology, existentialism, structuralism, post-structuralism' (vii).
Although psycholinguists have suggested that overgeneralizations decline after age two, there is observational evidence that children do not simply stop producing them, but instead learn to tact more of their controlling variables.
As her research and that of her daughter and other psycholinguists developed, Karmiloff-Smith (Karmiloff & Karmiloff-Smith, 2001) moved somewhat away from the "group of theorists [who] place social interaction at the center of their claims about the processes of language acquisition" (1994, p.
Today, linguists and psycholinguists increasingly call on sign language as an arbiter for or against various hypotheses on the nature of the human language faculty and the human mind.