psychomachia


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psychomachia

(ˌsaɪkəʊˈmækɪə) or

psychomachy

n
(Psychology) conflict of the soul
[C17: from Late Latin psӯchomachia, title of a poem by Prudentius (about 400), from Greek psukhē spirit + makhē battle]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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There are also depictions of the Psychomachia, an influential poem by Pudentius (5th c.
With Stoic self-discipline, he strives to eliminate external distractions and purge himself of pathos as he attempts to control the psychomachia ("passions of some difference") raging within him between his love and hatred for Julius Caesar.
Like in the traditional Psychomachia, the dramatization serves to visualize psychological processes; but now, these processes concern the complicated interactions that occur in concrete relationships.
Raffa offers two explanatory frameworks for understanding this episode: the tradition of Psychomachia, "in which," he writes, "internal conflicts receive external forms," and a psychoanalytic interpretation in which the witch/Siren corresponds to the Id, the saintly and alert woman to the Superego, and Virgil to the managing Ego (179).
This positive/negative "tug of war" so to speak, created conceptually and linguistically, complements the psychological "tug of war" being acted out on stage, the psychomachia. Tirso's technique here harks back to the very roots of the allegorical method itself.
Crawford's critique of allegorical discourse begins with arguably the first consistent literary allegory, Prudentius's Psychomachia. In Psychomachia, Crawford discovers how allegory resists narrative through the poem's repetitive and static violence.
If The Lord of the Rings pits the forces of good and evil against each other in non-negotiable clashes of arms, it is an unsettling oddity that Gollum-Smeagol is given the opportunity to negotiate with himself in an inner psychomachia for redemption.
His placing the psychomachia, a battle fought between the forces of evil and the forces of good, within the soul of a boy is an innovative achievement.
This includes, as a central device of the play, a chorus of the women of Canterbury that imitates the role of the chorus in ancient Greek tragedy, while especially emphasizing its dramatic and real impotence: "For us, the poor, there is no action, / But only to wait and to witness." (3) Also included are devices that resemble medieval psychomachia, wherein Becket is confronted by four internal Tempters, and subsequently killed by four stylized Knights, who, in part 2, break the faintly medieval decorum of the play to speak in the frank terms of a modern English politician.
Stapleton has written that in the Elegies Marlowe yokes Ovid's troubled and volatile persona "to the psychomachia paradigm of late medieval morality plays, replete with angelus bonus and angelus malus that ...
These may in turn have been influenced by the speeches in medieval morality plays in the psychomachia or "battle of the soul" tradition.