psychosociological

psychosociological

(ˌsaɪkəʊsəʊsɪəˈlɒdʒɪkəl)
adj
1. (Psychology) psychological and sociological
2. (Sociology) psychological and sociological
Translations

psychosociological

[ˈsaɪkəʊˌsəʊsɪəˈlɒdʒɪkəl] ADJpsicosociológico

psychosociological

adjpsychosoziologisch
References in periodicals archive ?
"Can People Obtain Objective Knowledge?," Psychosociological Issues in Human Resource Management 5(1): 90-119.
"The Jobless Economy in a Post-Work Society: How Automation Will Transform the Labor Market," Psychosociological Issues in Human Resource Management 6(2): 74-79.
"The Future of Workers: Contingent Forms of Labor Contracting in the Platform Economy," Psychosociological Issues in Human Resource Management 6(1): 172-177.
"The Operational Coherence of the Workforceas-a-service Pattern: Digitally Mediated Service Work, the Contingency of Ondemand Employment, and the Low-income Labor Market," Psychosociological Issues in Human Resource Management 6(1): 178-183.
"The Economics of the Online Gig Economy: Algorithmic Hiring Practices, Digital Labor-Market Intermediation, and Rights for Platform Workers," Psychosociological Issues in Human Resource Management 6(1): 160-165.
He covers relations of law, incomprehensiveness of just legality and illegality, levels of analysis of law and methods, psychosociological relations of law, comprehensive conceptions of possibility: legal theory, and the F-problem.
(2017b) "Individualism and the Vitality of Community Life: An Update," Psychosociological Issues in Human Resource Management 5(2): 7-24.
"Mobile Knowledge Work, Information Routines, and Digital Technologies," Psychosociological Issues in Human Resource Management 5(2): 187-192.
"The Social Structure of Cities: The Multidimensional Nature of Urban Inequality," Psychosociological Issues in Human Resource Management 6(1): 115-120.
"Gender-typical Responses to Stress and Illness," Psychosociological Issues in Human Resource Management 3(2): 65-70.
DM is an endocrinologic chronic disease with the psychosociological dimensions affecting all aspects of life.8 It has chronic complications causing serious morbidity and mortality, great cost to the patient and to population, and negatively affects physical, psychological health and the inner vision of the patient.8 DM shows comorbidity with depression and anxiety disorders.3,9-21
On the other, the behavioral approach to safety (Carter, 1992; Chhokar, 1990; Cooper, Phillips, Sutherland, & Makin, 1994; Hathaway & Dingus, 1992) with its psychosociological focus, says that unsafe behavior tends to perpetrate itself and/or is reinforced due to associated efforts (for example, immediate rewards in the form of salary remuneration) and to their adverse consequences which tend to appear later or much later on (for example, the onset of physical and/or psychological health problems).
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