psychosociology


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psychosociology

(ˌsaɪkəʊsəʊsɪˈɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Psychology) the study of how psychological and sociological factors combine
2. (Sociology) the study of how psychological and sociological factors combine
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(8) Roland Barthes, "Toward a Psychosociology of Contemporary Food Consumption," in Counihan and Van Esterik, Food and Culture, p.
2 Roland Barthes, "Toward a Psychosociology of Contemporary Food Consumption", Food and Culture: A Reader, Carole M.
By establishing a dialog with authors of this second tendency, we employ the framework of French psychosociology (15,20) that relies on a psychoanalytic perspective to understand the organization and its processes of change as a living reality, in which the subjects live your desires of affiliation, refusing to separate the individual from the collective, the affective from the institutional.
The psychosociology is constituted as a clinical research perspective in which is central the issue of production of direction of the subjects and its effects in relation to the work (10).
She opted to return home where she took a post at Mohammad V University in Rabat and taught methodology, family sociology and psychosociology at the Faculte des Lettres.
The complex commitments of groups to particular food and eating behaviours are noted by Roland Barthes in "Toward a Psychosociology of Contemporary Food Consumption" when he proposes that food is not only a source of nutrition but also "a system of communication, a body of images, a protocol of usages, situations, and behavior" that can be "read" for its semiotic codes as many other everyday practices can be (29).
"Toward a Psychosociology of Contemporary Food Consumption." Food and Culture: A Reader.
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