psychotoxic

psychotoxic

(ˌsaɪkəʊˈtɒksɪk)
adj
1. (Psychology) having a psychological rather than a physical cause
2. (Psychology) detrimental to mental health
References in periodicals archive ?
Addiction and drug use, as well as alcohol abuse, can cause serious psychotoxic effects that can lead to violent and extreme behaviour: physical assault, rape, robbery, murder attempt and even murder.
Behavioral evaluation of psychopharmacological and psychotoxic actions of methylxanthines by ambulatory activity and discrete avoidance in mice.
Actual psychotraumatic or psychotoxic childhood experiences that are open to objectification can be operationally defined as the occurrence of one or more of the following events or experiences: death of a parent or a sibling, or separation or divorce of the parents, all before the age of 18 years; separation from home for longer than 3 months when 5 to 15 years old, or longer than 1 month when less than 5 years old; physical abuse; sexual abuse; alcohol or drug addiction of one of the parents; psychiatric illness of one of the parents; violent quarrels between the parents; and so on.
Nicotine in smoking is not psychotoxic, does not lead to deranged and asocial behavior, nor to loss of personality control.
Psychotoxic conditions are also established from excessive or continued use of many of the depressants.
Hit titles include Doom I/II, Duke Nukem 3D, Sudden Strike, Cossacks, Sudden Strike Forever, Mystery of the Druids and soon to be released, Divine Divinity, Escape from Alcatraz, and Psychotoxic.
Debate continues about whether 1) medicines that treat depression are effective and worthwhile in the setting of active substance use or 2) aggressive treatment of substance misuse is a prerequisite for subsequent pharmacotherapy for depression that is "uncontaminated" by the psychotoxic effects of concurrent substances of abuse.
Although causality cannot be established based on this report, taken together with evidence that higher-potency cannabis is associated with a greater risk of psychotic emergence, (32) this case raises concerns about the iatrogenic and psychotoxic liability of medical marijuana use among those vulnerable to psychosis.