pteranodon

(redirected from pteranodons)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

pter·an·o·don

 (tə-răn′ə-dŏn′)
n.
Any of several large pterosaurs of the genus Pteranodon of the Cretaceous Period, having a long crested head, a scooplike beak, no teeth, and a wingspan of over 8 meters (26 feet).

[New Latin Pteranodōn, genus name : Greek pteron, wing; see -pter + Greek a-, an-, without; see a-1 + -odon.]

pteranodon

(tɛˈrænəˌdɒn)
n
(Palaeontology) a large tailless pterosaur, of the genus Pteranodon, of the late Cretaceous period, having a long bony crest, a toothless beak, and a wingspan of up to 23 feet

pter·an·o·don

(tə-răn′ə-dŏn′)
Any of several large, extinct, flying reptiles of the Cretaceous Period, having a long pointed head, no teeth, and a wingspan of 20 feet (6.1 meters) or more.
References in periodicals archive ?
As you walk around the gardens, you come across the Pteranodons, flying among the branches and emitting an ear-piercing screech as they flap their clawed wings.
Action sequences are orchestrated at a lick, including chaotic scenes of a flock of pteranodons plucking visitors from the ground.
Action sequences are orchestrated at a lick, seamlessly integrating digital trickery with live action, including chaotic scenes of a flock of pteranodons plucking visitors from the ground.
This time around, pteranodons have escaped from Ingen's ill-fated Jurassic Park, and what's worse is they have borne some young.
From fossil remains, Tennekes (1996) learned that pteranodons typically had a volume that translated into a weight, W, of 37 pounds, and a wing area, S, of 108 square feet.
Hellenic marbles, Egyptian mummies, Brazilian pteranodons or Argentinean dinosaurs are all well known examples, as are archaeological materials from Latin America.
The prehistoric goodies here are the Spinosaurus, an ugly beast which turns out to be even nastier than the T-Rex, and the awesome flying Pteranodons, which create some of the film's top tension.
Huge flying reptiles, like these pteranodons (pronounced tera'nodahnz) flew through the skies.
If, as is thought, a comet smacked into what is now the Yucatan at the close of the Cretaceous, killing off the dinosaurs and ammonites and pteranodons with a global cloud of sulfur and dust, the stable cycles of environmental change would have been seriously disrupted, meaning that species would be pressed to adapt to abruptly different environmental circumstances.