ptomaine

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pto·maine

 (tō′mān′, tō-mān′)
n.
A basic nitrogenous organic compound produced by bacterial putrefaction of protein.

[Italian ptomaina, from Greek ptōma, corpse, from piptein, ptō-, to fall; see pet- in Indo-European roots.]

ptomaine

(ˈtəʊmeɪn) or

ptomain

n
(Biochemistry) any of a group of amines, such as cadaverine or putrescine, formed by decaying organic matter
[C19: from Italian ptomaina, from Greek ptoma corpse, from piptein to fall]

pto•maine

(ˈtoʊ meɪn, toʊˈmeɪn)

n.
any of a class of foul-smelling nitrogenous substances produced by bacteria during putrefaction of animal or plant protein: formerly thought to cause food poisoning.
[< Italian ptomaina (1878) < Greek ptôma corpse + Italian -ina -ine2]
pto•main′ic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ptomaine - any of various amines (such as putrescine or cadaverine) formed by the action of putrefactive bacteria
amine, aminoalkane - a compound derived from ammonia by replacing hydrogen atoms by univalent hydrocarbon radicals
putrescine - a colorless crystalline ptomaine with a foul odor that is produced in decaying animal matter
cadaverine - a colorless toxic ptomaine with an unpleasant odor formed during the putrefaction of animal tissue
2.ptomaine - a term for food poisoning that is no longer in scientific use; food poisoning was once thought to be caused by ingesting ptomaines
food poisoning, gastrointestinal disorder - illness caused by poisonous or contaminated food
Translations

ptomaine

[ˈtəʊmeɪn]
A. N(p)tomaína f
B. CPD ptomaine poisoning Nenvenenamiento m (p)tomaínico

ptomaine

nLeichengift nt, → Ptomain nt (spec)

ptomaine

n tomaína
References in classic literature ?
If you were a sociable person, he was quite willing to enter into conversation with you, and to explain to you the deadly nature of the ptomaines which are found in tubercular pork; and while he was talking with you you could hardly be so ungrateful as to notice that a dozen carcasses were passing him untouched.
In an age when the existence of ptomaines is a mystery we should not wonder at anything
To-morrow, or some other day, a ptomaine bug, or some other of a thousand bugs, might jump out upon him and drag him down.