ptosis

(redirected from ptosis crutch)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

pto·sis

 (tō′sĭs)
n. pl. pto·ses (-sēz)
Abnormal lowering or drooping of an organ or a part, especially a drooping of the upper eyelid caused by muscle weakness or paralysis.

[Greek ptōsis, fall, from piptein, ptō-, to fall; see pet- in Indo-European roots.]

pto′tic (-tĭk) adj.

ptosis

(ˈtəʊsɪs)
n, pl ptoses (ˈtəʊsiːz)
(Pathology) prolapse or drooping of a part, esp the eyelid
[C18: from Greek: a falling]
ptotic adj

pto•sis

(ˈtoʊ sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-siz)
prolapse or drooping of an organ or part, esp. a drooping of the upper eyelid.
[1735–45; < New Latin < Greek ptṓsis a falling]
pto•tic (ˈtoʊ tɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ptosis - drooping of the upper eyelid caused by muscle paralysis and weakness
brow ptosis - sagging eyebrows
descensus, prolapse, prolapsus - the slipping or falling out of place of an organ (as the uterus)
Translations

pto·sis

n. Gr. ptosis, prolapso de un órgano o parte, esp. visto en el párpado superior.

ptosis

n ptosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
A ptosis crutch that is attached to the lens or frame of the spectacles seems to offer an appropriate solution to elevating the upper eyelid above the visual axis.
Although the ptosis crutch itself is not a novel idea, there is no record of a commercial ptosis crutch that is developed and available in South Africa.
The aim of the present study was to design and construct a modular ptosis crutch for the South African myasthenia gravis population.
The primary aim of the study was the design of a modular and adjustable ptosis crutch for MG patients, which could be produced using low-cost manufacturing methods.
Determine the anthropometric measures that would inform the ptosis crutch design.
Design and prototype a modular and adjustable ptosis crutch suitable for the MG population.
Verify the efficacy of the ptosis crutch within the clinical setting.
The ptosis crutch requirements and design parameters, outlined below, were defined with the input from the clinician, designer, and user.