public assistance


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public assistance

n.
Aid, such as money or food, given to homeless and other financially needy people, the aged, or the inhabitants of a disaster-stricken area; relief.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

public assistance

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) US payment given to individuals by government agencies on the basis of need
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pub′lic assis′tance


n.
government aid to the poor, disabled, blind, or aged, or to dependent children.
[1900–05]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

public assistance

Aid given in the form of money or food by a government to the needy or homeless.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.public assistance - governmental provision of economic assistance to persons in needpublic assistance - governmental provision of economic assistance to persons in need; "she lives on welfare"
social insurance - government provision for unemployed, injured, or aged people; financed by contributions from employers and employees as well as by government revenue
relief - aid for the aged or indigent or handicapped; "he has been on relief for many years"
pogey, pogy, dole - money received from the state
economic aid, financial aid, aid - money to support a worthy person or cause
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

public assistance

noun
Assistance, especially money, food, and other necessities, given to the needy or dispossessed:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Public assistance would provide financial relief to the eligible counties that have "exhausted their available local resources and are seeking reimbursement for the flood-related damages and associated costs incurred from responding to this natural disaster," according to a release from the Illinois Emergency Management Agency.
She explained that Oplan Balik Eskwela and the public assistance stations 'primarily aim to address the problems commonly encountered at the start of the school year to ensure that learners are already properly enrolled and able to attend school by the first day of classes.'
Fink, in which the Eighth Circuit became the first circuit court to include the Child Tax Credit as a "public assistance benefit" under the Missouri exemption statute in a bankruptcy proceeding.
Public assistance gives cash payments to 41 poor families or individuals.
The same applies to public assistance recipients, in order to continue receiving state aid, she explained.
It would also help prevent public assistance benefits from being used to purchase alcohol, tobacco and lottery tickets.
Nationally, more than half - 52 percent - of the families of front-line fast-food workers use at least one public assistance program, compared with a quarter of the total workforce, according to the report.
Combined effects of low income and public assistance create a rich environment for delayed medical care.
The most "fundamental and radical change" will involve getting rid of the one law on public assistance which covers all population groups, the disabled, single parents, elderly who need care, those with no sources of income, asylum seekers.
that public assistance programs, such as the Food Stamp and National School Lunch programs, contribute to obesity among the poor.
His research showed that child-parent center students were less likely than those in the comparison group to incur health care, public assistance, prison and other "social costs."

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