public house


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

public house

n. Chiefly British
A place, such as a tavern or bar, that is licensed to sell alcoholic beverages.

public house

n
1. (Commerce) Brit the formal name for pub
2. (Brewing) Brit the formal name for pub
3. (Commerce) US and Canadian an inn, tavern, or small hotel

pub′lic house`


n.
1. Brit. tavern.
2. an inn or hostelry.
[1565–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.public house - tavern consisting of a building with a bar and public roomspublic house - tavern consisting of a building with a bar and public rooms; often provides light meals
alehouse - a tavern where ale is sold
bar, barroom, ginmill, saloon, taproom - a room or establishment where alcoholic drinks are served over a counter; "he drowned his sorrows in whiskey at the bar"
free house - a public house that is not controlled by a brewery and so is free to sell different brands of beer and ale
tap house, tavern - a building with a bar that is licensed to sell alcoholic drinks
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Translations
حانَه، خَمّارَه
hostinecrestaurace
værtshus
krá

public house

n (Brit) → pub m inv

public

(ˈpablik) adjective
of, for, or concerning, the people (of a community or nation) in general. a public library; a public meeting; Public opinion turned against him; The public announcements are on the back page of the newspaper; This information should be made public and not kept secret any longer.
ˈpublicly adverb
puˈblicity (-ˈblisə-) noun
1. advertising. There is a lot of publicity about the dangers of smoking.
2. the state of being widely known. Film stars usually like publicity.
ˈpublicize, ˈpublicise (-saiz) verb
to make widely known; to advertise. We are publicizing a new product.
public holiday
a day on which all (or most) shops, offices and factories are closed for a holiday.
public house (usually abbreviated to pub (pab) )
a house where alcoholic drinks are sold to the public.
public relations (also PR)
the attitude, understanding etc between a firm, government etc and the public.
ˌpublic ˈservice anˌnouncement noun
(especially American) an announcement on television or radio given as a service to the public.
public spirit
a desire to do things for the good of the community.
ˌpublic-ˈspirited adjective
public transport
the bus, tram and train services provided by a state or community for the public.
in public
in front of other people, not in private. They are always quarrelling in public.
the public
people in general. This swimming pool is open to the public every day.
public opinion poll
a way of finding out public opinion by questioning a certain number of people.

the public is singular: The public is entitled to know the facts .
References in classic literature ?
Besides which, your efforts to get a glimpse of the public house clock from the outside are attended with great difficulties.
The captain had given money for us to the hunters, and the hunters were waiting in a certain Japanese public house for us to come and get it.
The pursuit of the new remedy for stimulating a sluggish brain took him to a public house, kept by the professional pedestrian who had the honor of training him when he contended at Athletic Sports.
For those were times when there was no rigid demarcation of rank between the farmer and the respectable artisan, and on the home hearth, as well as in the public house, they might be seen taking their jug of ale together; the farmer having a latent sense of capital, and of weight in parish affairs, which sustained him under his conspicuous inferiority in conversation.
After they had left the station they had driven through a tiny village and she had seen whitewashed cottages and the lights of a public house.
The Vicar of Surle, a tiny hamlet by the sea, was to be seen every evening in the public house a stone's throw from his vicarage; and the churchwardens had been to Mr.
They did not put up at the hotel, but walked away to a public house.
My view of it," he flamed out, bringing his clenched hand down upon the table as if he had been in a public house dicing with blackguards--"my view of it is that it was a characteristically dastardly assassination by that damned traitor, Washington, and his ragamuffin rebels
Having waited there for Rostopchin who did not turn up, they became convinced that Moscow would be surrendered, and then dispersed all about the town to the public houses and cookshops.

Full browser ?