public key cryptography


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public key cryptography

n.
Any of various techniques that use two different keys whereby data encrypted with one key can only be decrypted using the other. In typical use, the recipient makes one key public and keeps the other private, so that anyone may encrypt data for the recipient, but only the recipient can decrypt it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Full Domain Subgroup Hiding and Constant Size Group Signatures In Public Key Cryptography. Lecture notes in computer science, vol.
(Of course, she uses the exact same recipe to encrypt every other letter in her message too, for which Bob uses the exact same recipe on his side of the line to decrypt the message.) And this, public key cryptography, is one of the foundation stones of data-in-motion encryption.
Public key cryptography uses two keys which are mathematically-related.
The multivariate public key cryptography (MPKC) is one of the promising candidates for post-quantum cryptography.
[11] ANSI X9.63: Public Key Cryptography for the Financial Services Industry: Elliptic Curve Key Agreement and Key Transport Protocols, working draft, X9 Standard, October 2000.
Therefore, more sophisticated methods were designed to assure various levels of security, these methods are categorized as: Symmetric Key Cryptography (SKC) and Public Key Cryptography (PKC).
In 2003, Al-Riyami and Paterson [3] introduced the concept of certificateless public key cryptography (CL-PKC).
Since then, public key cryptography has become the backbone of modern Internet communication.
The TLS protocol, which is widely used in PCs and other devices, employs public key cryptography.
With traditional public key cryptography, if a user, Bob, wishes to send a message to another user, Alice, he needs to know Alice's public key.
Public key cryptography, like RSA, works because it is so difficult to figure out which two large numbers (keys) were multiplied to a specific result (encoded message).
Funabiki, "Revocable group signature schemes with constant costs for signing and verifying," in Public Key Cryptography: PKC 2009, vol.

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