publicity-shy

Translations

publicity-shy

[pʌbˈlɪsɪtɪˌʃaɪ] ADJreacio a la publicidad
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
Publicity-shy Philip Day, who was brought up on a council estate near Manchester, has built a retail empire which includes the Edinburgh Woollen Mill, Peacocks, Jane Norman, Austin Reed and Bonmarche.
Typical Digong: publicity-shy when it comes to what he does for his people.
The house is everything a publicity-shy celebrity could want.
A PUBLICITY-shy chemicals mogul who grew up in a council house in Oldham is now the richest man in Britain.
The publicity-shy one of the Geldof clan, 33, will tie the knot this summer with longterm boyfriend and "sand artist" Andy Robertson, 35, at the St Mary Magdalene and St Lawrence church, near the Kent home of her father Sir Bob.
His son Ian said: "In an age of high-profile union barons, he was a publicity-shy, but principled trade union leader during one of the country's greatest upheavals in industrial relations under Margaret Thatcher."
Publicity-shy farmers may baulk at the prospect but deputy farming minister Rebecca Evans said the plans would benefit the industry by making producers aware of nearby TB breakdowns.
But some of the most ambitious plans were created by Harry Hyams, the pioneering yet publicity-shy property developer.
Miley Cyrus, never knowingly publicity-shy, has been targeted by a satirical gossip site that claimed she was pregnant with rapper Juicy J's baby.
And the mind-boggling windfall has made the publicity-shy 18-year-old one of Britain's richest teens.
Sanderson, 47, has sent out 19 Flat winners in three years with a licence, but the ending of her association with publicity-shy Richard Budge has meant she no longer feels the same constraints in dealing with the media.