publicness


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pub·lic

 (pŭb′lĭk)
adj.
1. Of, concerning, or affecting the community or the people: the public good.
2. Maintained for or used by the people or community: a public park.
3. Capitalized in shares of stock that can be traded on the open market: a public company; took the company public.
4. Participated in or attended by the people or community: "Opinions are formed in a process of open discussion and public debate" (Hannah Arendt).
5. Connected with or acting on behalf of the people, community, or government: public office.
6. Enrolled in or attending a public school: transit passes for public students.
7. Open to the knowledge or judgment of all: a public scandal.
n.
1. The community or the people as a whole.
2. A group of people sharing a common interest: the reading public.
3. Admirers or followers, especially of a famous person. See Usage Note at collective noun.
Idioms:
go public with Informal
To reveal to the public a previously unknown or secret piece of information: The president finally had to go public with the scandal.
in public
In such a way as to be visible to the scrutiny of the people: "A career is born in public—talent in privacy" (Marilyn Monroe).

[Middle English publik, from Old French public, from Latin pūblicus, alteration (influenced by pūbēs, adult population) of poplicus, from populus, people, of Etruscan origin.]

pub′lic·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

publicness

(ˈpʌblɪknəs)
n
the state of being public or acceptable
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The conditions of a spaces' publicness are determined by "rules of access, the source and nature of control over entry to a space, individual and collective behaviours sanctioned in specific spaces, and rules of use" (Low and Smith 2006, pp.
According to the study presented at the meeting of ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, some people maintain a mental shortcut, called "publicness heuristic," which is a mindset that inhibits a person from revealing private things in public.
It will be interesting to see whether a New Yorker or someone else ends up creating a widely seen new symbol for publicness in New York City," said Jerold S.
I believe, however, that the confidence with which Mitchell affirms the publicness of the literary/verbal image is diminished by his philosophical recourse to Wittgenstein regarding the nature of mental images.
Just as the literature on medical publics draws on Gerard Hauser's (1999) work, contributors to this special issue take as their starting place these assumptions: variety exists across different health definitions and experiences; certain health conditions, issues, and controversies attract the attention of individuals who disagree with dominant understandings of health, and; contested sites of medical deliberation provide valuable resources for investigating how medical discourses operate in relation to the overall publicness of health.
property even when doing so might compromise due process, the publicness
The book begins with an overview of how online activism has already been studied, such as the Mapping the Arabic Blogosphere project, and outlines theoretical approaches for understanding and studying online activism in general, discussing social movement theory, the public sphere, concepts of publicness and counter-publicness, and the ideas of Belgian political theorist Chantal Mouffe.
Modern literature on governance has proved it time and again that uncontrolled power and lack of accountability result in reducing the 'publicness' of public service - making the governance machinery indifferent to the needs of public.
I contend Mamfakinch taps into newly networked and increasingly worldly youth digital cultures in constructing new processes of public formation and modes of publicness. The site acts as a platform for a multiplicity of publics disillusioned with institutional politics and unaccustomed to making direct demands of power.
"There is a strong culture of transparency and publicness on Twitter," he said.
The latter half eschew a specific theoretical perspective, instead relying on the well-known categories of "publicness" and "materiality" while the authors still return to the leitmotifs of "the stranger" and "dwelling."
She added, 'external circumstances, triggered by the Sewol disaster as well as incidents of plagiarism and sexual harassment within the literary community, have forced Korean writers to rethink fiction itself, and this collective experience of acknowledging the power of publicness had led to changes in the sensibilities of Korean literature.' Choi discussed the obligations and dedication of translators for the panel.