pudency


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pu·den·cy

 (pyo͞od′n-sē)
n.
Modesty.

[Late Latin pudentia, from Latin pudēre, to make or be ashamed.]

pudency

(ˈpjuːdənsɪ)
n
modesty, shame, or prudishness
[C17: from Late Latin pudentia, from Latin pudēre to feel shame]

pu•den•cy

(ˈpyud n si)

n.
modesty.
[1605–15; < Late Latin pudentia shame = Latin pudent- (s. of pudēns, present participle of pudēre to be ashamed)]

pudency

modesty or shyness; embarrassment.
See also: Attitudes
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
The art of life has a pudency, and will not be exposed.
Oliver Wendell Holmes is reported to have "complained that trying to talk to Hawthorne was like 'lovemaking.' Hawthorne's 'shy, beautiful soul had to be wooed from its bashful pudency like an unschooled maiden.'" (24) Emerson and Hawthorne shared a strange, jangly friendship.