pudendum


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Related to pudendum: pudendal nerve

pu·den·dum

 (pyo͞o-dĕn′dəm)
n. pl. pu·den·da (-də)
often pudenda The external genitals of a human, especially of a woman.

[Latin, neuter gerundive of pudēre, to make or be ashamed.]

pu·den′dal (-dĕn′dəl) adj.

pudendum

(pjuːˈdɛndəm)
n, pl -da (-də)
(Anatomy) (often plural) the human external genital organs collectively, esp of a female
[C17: from Late Latin, from Latin pudenda the shameful (parts), from pudēre to be ashamed]
puˈdendal, pudic adj

pu•den•dum

(pyuˈdɛn dəm)

n., pl. -da (-də).
Usu., pudenda. the external genital organs, esp. those of the female; vulva.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin, neuter pl. gerundive of Latin pudēre to be ashamed]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pudendum - human external genital organs collectively especially of a female
Translations

pudendum

n pl <pudenda>
(of woman)Vulva f
pudenda pl (of either sex)primäre Geschlechtsmerkmale pl, → Scham f (geh)

pu·den·dum

n. pudendum, órganos genitales externos, esp. los femeninos.
References in periodicals archive ?
("Fanny" in eighteenth-century and in modern British slang = female pudendum.) The reference in the last three lines--"some willing victim bleeds"--is literally hymeneal.
Both the terms pudendum femininum and vulva are given in TA and, as such, assist in understanding the meaning of corresponding structures such as n.
genitalia--pudenda--from the Latin pudendum, meaning "thing to be
Although in Modern English the substantive "lap" does not bear any sexual connotations, a lap literally meant the "female pudendum" in Middle English, while the word (often in plural, lappes) is found as a euphemism to denote the vagina from the 15th to the 17th century, as used, for instance, by Shakespeare.
A 44-year-old woman, presented with 3 primary MM lesions on the pudendum, left sole, and left heel.
number of metaphors for the pudendum that jostle alongside each other.
O barbe arbiter ac inique iudex Tu quid saepe aciei nihil merenti Mendosae Latiae favere es ausus, Quae in rete ingerere impotens habetur Follem (nam manibus vetatur uti): Quaenam convicia probrosiora Pro tuo crimine, ultor haud benignus, In tuum facinus vomam pudendum? Rebus qui Latiis studet misellis Profari nequit intumente bile, Quod indigna satis putatur certe Quam Victoria das ei repente, O trifucifer arbiter spuende!
But the older woman then seduced him, and Hausenstein "realized that art is nothing but a beautiful cool hand placed by a woman, sometimes not very carefully, over her hot pudendum." He relates that their meetings "grew less and less artistic" (58).
They share the attributes of both sexes and are both husband and wife." (16) Aristotle tried to sort this out, patiently explaining that both the male and female Striped Hyena have anal scent pouches, which look like male scrotums; male hyenas, moreover, seemed to sport female genitalia: "under the tail a line like the pudendum of the female." (17) Yet he was at a loss to say where the actual reproductive organs were, and as late as the seventeenth century it was commonplace to regard the hyena as a sex-changer.