puerperal fever


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puerperal fever

n.
An illness resulting from infection of the endometrium following childbirth or abortion, marked by fever and septicemia and usually caused by unsterile technique. Also called childbed fever.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

puerperal fever

n
(Pathology) a serious, formerly widespread, form of blood poisoning caused by infection contracted during childbirth. Also called: childbed fever
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

puer′peral fe′ver


n.
a bacterial infection of the endometrium occurring in women after childbirth or abortion, usu. as the result of unsterile obstetric practices.
[1760–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.puerperal fever - serious form of septicemia contracted by a woman during childbirth or abortion (usually attributable to unsanitary conditions); formerly widespread but now uncommon
blood poisoning, septicaemia, septicemia - invasion of the bloodstream by virulent microorganisms from a focus of infection
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

puerperal fever

nKindbettfieber nt, → Puerperalfieber nt (spec)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
DALLAS -- Abdominal CT scans changed therapeutic management in 39% of women being unsuccessfully treated for refractory puerperal fever, a retrospective study has determined.
The control chart (3) he published on puerperal fever in Vienna in the 1840s is spectacular.
Ida John died aged just thirty of puerperal fever following the birth of her fifth son, but in these vivid, funny and sometimes devastatingly sad letters she is startlingly alive on the page; a young woman ahead of her time (almost of our own time) living a complex and compelling drama here revealed for the first time by the woman at its very heart.
Licensure was associated with an almost seven percent reduction in maternal mortality caused by puerperal fever, the leading cause of maternal mortality at the time, suggesting that midwifery training in antiseptic techniques and other medical practices improved care.
M Shah et al [8] in their study, maternal complications included chorioamnionitis (4%), puerperal fever (22%), abruption placenta (2%), and wound infection (Both abdominal and episiotomy) in 14% cases.
The hospital acquired infection testing market report estimates the market size (Revenue USD million - 2013 to 2020) for market segmentation based on disease test (blood stream associated infection, MRSA infection, Hospital-acquired pneumonia, surgical associated infection, UTI, Gastroenteritis, puerperal fever, etc.), and forecasts growth trends (CAGR% - 2016 to 2020).
For example, when the mid-19th century Hungarian physician Ignaz Semmelweis showed that proper hand disinfection correlated with a dramatic decrease in the occurrence of puerperal fever, his suggestion was dismissed because he had no proof of his causal explanation.
While working as an assistant professor at the Vienna General Hospital in Austria, Semmelweis noticed that women were dying at an alarmingly high rate at his clinic: up to 35% of women giving birth died of puerperal fever, an infectious pelvic disease, mostly caused by endometritis, leading to bacteremia, septicemia, and death.
But there were complications after the birth of Austen in 1863 and Harriet died of puerperal fever soon after.