puff of air


Also found in: Thesaurus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.puff of air - a short light gust of airpuff of air - a short light gust of air    
gust, blast, blow - a strong current of air; "the tree was bent almost double by the gust"
References in classic literature ?
At length, he was not more than one hundred yards from a bank, covered with green trees, when a puff of air strongly impregnated with a musky odor reached him.
A puff of air extinguished the candle, and the black night shut him out from her in an instant.
I was entering my room, and on opening the door, the window, too, being open, a puff of air came suddenly and carried off this paper - this letter of her majesty's; I darted after it, and gained the window just in time to see it flutter a moment in the breeze and disappear down the well.
His jump is a very fox-like pounce and a double jump is indicated by a puff of air.
Looking down into the sea, the view of the rocks and seaweed was disturbed by an unusual wind, like a puff of air directed straight down onto the water.
She had so much distaste for the word that I could feel the puff of air from her mouth push my hair from my cheek as she whispered the word, "hate.
That's called PowerPulse and pumps a high pressure puff of air into the turbocharger at low revs to smooth the delay you often find between ordering full power and it arriving.
That's called PowerPulse and pumps a high pressure puff of air into the turbocharger at low revs to smooth the delay you otherwise find between ordering full power and it arriving that is a downside of turbo'ed motors.
A machine called an autorefractor will measure how well your eyes focus, and a tonometer, which uses a puff of air to check your eye pressure, can help to pick up early signs of glaucoma.
Instead of smoke, battery-operated e-cigarettes produce aerosols, tiny liquid particles suspended in a puff of air.
The Unstable Flame program is executed when the wind sensor detects a light puff of air that is not strong enough to blow out the candle.
The same principle explains why, regardless of your age, you have a little puff of air blown into your eye when examined for new glasses.