puffin


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puf·fin

 (pŭf′ĭn)
n.
Any of several seabirds of the genus Fratercula of northern regions, characteristically having black-and-white plumage and a vertically flattened, triangular bill that is brightly colored during breeding season.

[Middle English poffoun, puffon, perhaps from puf, puff; see puff.]

puffin

(ˈpʌfɪn)
n
(Animals) any of various northern diving birds of the family Alcidae (auks, etc), esp Fratercula arctica (common or Atlantic puffin), having a black-and-white plumage and a brightly coloured vertically flattened bill: order Charadriiformes
[C14: perhaps of Cornish origin]

puf•fin

(ˈpʌf ɪn)

n.
any of several sea birds of the genus Fratercula, of the auk family, with a short neck and a colorful, triangular bill.
[1300–50; Middle English poffoun, poffin, puffon (compare Anglo-Latin poffo, puffo); orig. uncertain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.puffin - any of two genera of northern seabirds having short necks and brightly colored compressed billspuffin - any of two genera of northern seabirds having short necks and brightly colored compressed bills
sea bird, seabird, seafowl - a bird that frequents coastal waters and the open ocean: gulls; pelicans; gannets; cormorants; albatrosses; petrels; etc.
Alcidae, family Alcidae - web-footed diving seabirds of northern seas: auks; puffins; guillemots; murres; etc.
Atlantic puffin, Fratercula arctica - common puffin of the northern Atlantic
Fratercula corniculata, horned puffin - northern Pacific puffin
Lunda cirrhata, tufted puffin - northern Pacific puffin having a large yellow plume over each eye

puffin

noun
Related words
adjective alcidine
habitation puffinry
Translations
papuchalk
GelbschopflundHundlundLundLundevogelNashornalk
lunni
macareuxmacareux moine
lundi
alka bielobradá
lunnefågel

puffin

[ˈpʌfɪn] Nfrailecillo m

puffin

[ˈpʌfɪn] n (= bird) → macareux mpuff pastry (British) puff paste (US) npâte f feuilletée

puffin

nPapageientaucher m, → Lund m

puffin

[ˈpʌfɪn] npulcinella m di mare, puffino
References in classic literature ?
"Why, 'e took up 'is end o' the boxes like they was pounds of tea, and me a puffin' an' a blowin' afore I could upend mine anyhow, an' I'm no chicken, neither."
And over this desolate face of nature a stern silence reigned, scarcely broken by the flapping of the wings of petrels and puffins. Everything was frozen--even the noise.
Naturally the Chickies and the Gooverooskies and the Epatkas--the Burgomaster Gulls and the Kittiwakes and the Puffins, who are always looking for a chance to be rude, took up the cry, and--so Limmershin told me--for nearly five minutes you could not have heard a gun fired on Walrus Islet.
Rob Fray, who luckily for the puffin is a bird recorder with the local bird club, came across the animal on Monday night.
Mrs Trevelyan told fellow MPs: "When they take off for flight, we see just why the Atlantic puffin - fratercula arctica, or the friar of the Arctic, so named because of its monkish black hood - is to be respected.
The other two packs are '6+', which is actually 6--8, and include sheets inspired by Wonder Woman(from Puffin's DC Super Hero Girls series), Michael Rosen, Diary of a Wimpy Kidand The Audition, among others.
Directly under Puffin Island in my atlas is the word Priestholme.
The authors suggested that climate-driven shifts in prey abundance and/or distribution, combined with the onset of molt, may have caused this puffin die-off, and note that further climate variability in this region is probable.
The Scottish Seabird Centre, a leading conservation charity, said the first of this year's pufflings (puffin chicks) have started to make an appearance.
Most are on Skomer Island, off Pembrokeshire, with others at Skokholm, Bardsey, Puffin Island and RSPB South Stack.
These numbers can be extrapolated to give an indication of the puffin population on each island - so they don't have to count every bird.