puir

puir

(puːr; pyr)
adj
a Scot word for poor
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
He was only fut for a pugsty, an' a dom puir apology for thot same.
But ut wull show ye what a puir fellow thot mate was.
I'm only a puir woman, my leddy--d'ye mean yer husband here?
21) and gif the persewer and defender be puir and may nocht pay the vnlaw thai sall be pvnist in thair persouns.
What care some gentry if they're weel though a' the puir wad dee
Little Annie's greetin' tae/ Sae whit can puir wee Mammy dae/ But gie them a penny atween them twae/ Tae buy mair Coulter's Candy.
50) And yet, the responsibility seems to fall on "that puir doited deevil of a knight-baronet" (212), as Edie Ochiltree describes Wardour.
Hope they catch him before he does it to some puir wifie.
ye cry as ye see the puir shilpit ard lad hirpling aboot the mart at Wooler (if there's a mart at Wooler yet).
This is also the stage the poet sets in the prologue to her dream, which describes the poet as removed from society, "In companie I no waies could remaine, / But fled resort, and so alone did goe" (A2r), and proceeds in a kind of personal prayer, "Than I began my lamentatioun,/and said, O Lord, how lang is it thy will, / That thy puir Sancts [the communion of "a great many Christians"?
Maggie Lacey ("a puir brown hillside lassie"), Sloane Shelton (her "puir auld mither") and David Don Miller ("yon brave and honest lad," who derails passing trains to attract paying customers to the local inn) play these foxes with a totally untrustworthy air of innocence.
We never see puir working folk Wi' bauchles on their feet, Like perfect icicles wi' cauld, Gaun starving through the street.