pulley

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pul·ley

 (po͝ol′ē)
n. pl. pul·leys
1. A simple machine consisting essentially of a wheel with a grooved rim in which a pulled rope or chain can run to change the direction of the pull and thereby lift a load.
2. A wheel turned by or driving a belt.

[Middle English poley, from Old French polie and from Medieval Latin poliva, both ultimately from Greek polos, axis; see kwel- in Indo-European roots.]

pulley

(ˈpʊlɪ)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) a wheel with a grooved rim in which a rope, chain, or belt can run in order to change the direction or point of application of a force applied to the rope, etc
2. (Mechanical Engineering) a number of such wheels pivoted in parallel in a block, used to raise heavy loads
3. (Mechanical Engineering) a wheel with a flat, convex, or grooved rim mounted on a shaft and driven by or driving a belt passing around it
[C14 poley, from Old French polie, from Vulgar Latin polidium (unattested), apparently from Late Greek polidion (unattested) a little pole, from Greek polos axis]

pul•ley

(ˈpʊl i)

n., pl. -leys.
1. a wheel for supporting, guiding, or transmitting force to or from a moving rope or cable that rides in a groove in its edge.
2. a combination of such wheels in a block, or of such wheels or blocks in a tackle, to increase the force applied.
[1275–1325; Middle English poley, puly < Middle French polie « Medieval Greek *polídion little pivot]

pul·ley

(po͝ol′ē)
A simple machine consisting of a wheel over which a pulled rope or chain runs to change the direction of the pull used for lifting a load. Combinations of two or more pulleys working together reduce the force needed to lift a load. See also block and tackle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pulley - a simple machine consisting of a wheel with a groove in which a rope can run to change the direction or point of application of a force applied to the ropepulley - a simple machine consisting of a wheel with a groove in which a rope can run to change the direction or point of application of a force applied to the rope
block and tackle - pulley blocks with associated rope or cable
bullock block, bollock - a pulley-block at the head of a topmast
fairlead - a pulley-block used to guide a rope forming part of a ship's rigging to avoid chafing
idle pulley, idle wheel, idler pulley - a pulley on a shaft that presses against a guide belt to guide or tighten it
simple machine, machine - a device for overcoming resistance at one point by applying force at some other point
Translations
بَكَرَه
kladka
trisse
csiga1
talía, blökk; trissa
skridinys
trīsis
kladka
makarapalanga

pulley

[ˈpʊlɪ] Npolea f

pulley

[ˈpʊli] npoulie fpull-in [ˈpʊlɪn] (British) pull-off [ˈpʊlɒf] (US) nparking m

pulley

n (= wheel)Rolle f; (= block)Flaschenzug m; (= hospital apparatus)Streckapparat m

pulley

[ˈpʊlɪ] npuleggia, carrucola

pulley

(ˈpuli) noun
a wheel over which a rope etc can pass in order to lift heavy objects.

pul·ley

n. polea.
References in classic literature ?
Wheels creak on their axles as the cogs engage one another and the revolving pulleys whirr with the rapidity of their movement, but a neighboring wheel is as quiet and motionless as though it were prepared to remain so for a hundred years; but the moment comes when the lever catches it and obeying the impulse that wheel begins to creak and joins in the common motion the result and aim of which are beyond its ken.
As he approached, he heard the noise of the pulleys which grated under the weight of the massy pails; he also fancied he heard the melancholy moaning of the water which falls back again into the wells -- a sad, funereal, solemn sound, which strikes the ear of the child and the poet -- both dreamers -- which the English call splash; Arabian poets, gasgachau; and which we Frenchmen, who would be poets, can only translate by a paraphrase -- the noise of water falling into water.
For, the time was to come, when the gaunt scarecrows of that region should have watched the lamplighter, in their idleness and hunger, so long, as to conceive the idea of improving on his method, and hauling up men by those ropes and pulleys, to flare upon the darkness of their condition.
And she would drag him up above the clouds, in the magnificent disorder of the grid, where she loved to make him giddy by running in front of him along the frail bridges, among the thousands of ropes fastened to the pulleys, the windlasses, the rollers, in the midst of a regular forest of yards and masts.
Nine hundred of the strongest men were employed to draw up these cords, by many pulleys fastened on the poles; and thus, in less than three hours, I was raised and slung into the engine, and there tied fast.
It is said that two years ago a stranger let himself down from the top of it with ropes and pulleys, and painted all over it, in blue letters bigger than those in Schiller's name, these words:
As I was just now saying, he will attempt to represent the roll of thunder, the noise of wind and hall, or the creaking of wheels, and pulleys, and the various sounds of flutes; pipes, trumpets, and all sorts of instruments: he will bark like a dog, bleat like a sheep, or crow like a cock; his entire art will consist in imitation of voice and gesture, and there will be very little narration.
Thus speaking, he led the way up the ladder; and hastily closing the window-shutter of the room into which it led, lowered a lantern which hung at the end of a rope and pulley passed through one of the heavy beams in the ceiling: and which cast a dim light upon an old table and three chairs that were placed beneath it.
She had not contented herself with opening the door from above by the usual arrangement of a creaking pulley, though she had looked down at me first from an upper window, dropping the inevitable challenge which in Italy precedes the hospitable act.
Van Baerle, therefore, had devised a contrivance, a sort of pulley, by means of which he was able to lower or to raise his jug below the ledge of tiles and stone before his window.
One of the sailors leaped on shore, a cord creaked as it ran through a pulley, and Dantes guessed they were at the end of the voyage, and that they were mooring the boat.
When I had grown to sufficient size, I was required to go to the "big house" at meal-times to fan the flies from the table by means of a large set of paper fans operated by a pulley.