pulpous


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pulp

 (pŭlp)
n.
1. A soft moist shapeless mass of matter.
2.
a. The soft moist part of fruit.
b. Plant matter remaining after a process, such as the extraction of juice by pressure, has been completed: apple pulp.
3. The soft pith forming the contents of the stem of a plant.
4. A mixture of cellulose material, such as wood, paper, and rags, ground up and moistened to make paper.
5. The soft tissue forming the inner structure of a tooth and containing nerves and blood vessels.
6. A mixture of crushed ore and water.
7.
a. A publication, such as a magazine or book, containing lurid subject matter: "The pulps took the mystery story out of the parlors ... and onto the 'mean streets'" (Tony Hillerman).
b. Lurid or sensational writing or subject matter: made a good living writing pulp.
v. pulped, pulp·ing, pulps
v.tr.
1. To reduce to pulp.
2. To remove the pulp from (coffee berries).
v.intr.
To be reduced to a pulpy consistency.

[Middle English, from Latin pulpa, fleshy parts of the body, fruit pulp.]

pulp′i·ness n.
pulp′ous (pŭl′pəs), pulp′y adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pulpous

(ˈpʌlpəs)
n
soft and yielding
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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pulpous

adjective
Yielding easily to pressure or weight; not firm:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The higher incidence of embolism in the cervicothoracic and thoracolumbar spinal cord segments may be due to the greater arterial supply (mainly in the intumescences) that increases the risk of mechanically projecting the pulpous nucleus into the spinal cord blood supply (CAUZINILLE & KORNEGAY, 1996).
Anti-inflammatory cytokine therapy may be an effective treatment of sciatica which resulted from disc herniation due to its capability of preventing the dorsal root ganglion compartment syndrome, which might be a side effect of applying nucleus pulpous topically.