punching

(redirected from punchings)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

punch 1

 (pŭnch)
n.
1. A tool for circular or other piercing: a leather punch.
2. A tool for forcing a pin, bolt, or rivet in or out of a hole.
3. A tool for stamping a design on a surface.
4. A tool for making a countersink.
v. punched, punch·ing, punch·es
v.tr.
1. To make (a hole or opening), as by using a punch or similar implement.
2. To make a hole in (something), as by using a punch: The conductor punched my train ticket.
v.intr.
To pierce something; make a hole or opening: My foot punched through the ice.

[Middle English pounce, punche, from Old French poinçon, ponchon; see puncheon1. V., from Middle English pouncen, punchen, to prick, from Old French poinçoner, ponchoner, to emboss with a punch; see punch2.]

punch′er n.

punch 2

 (pŭnch)
tr.v. punched, punch·ing, punch·es
1.
a. To hit with a sharp blow of the fist.
b. To drive (the fist) into or through something.
c. To drive (a ball, for example) with the fist.
d. To make (a hole) by thrusting the fist.
2.
a. Archaic To poke or prod with a stick.
b. Western US To herd (cattle).
3. To depress (the accelerator of a car) forcefully.
4.
a. To depress (a key or button, for example) in order to activate a device or perform an operation: punched the "repeat" key.
b. To enter (data) by keying: punched in the number on the computer.
5. Baseball To hit (a ball) with a quick short swing.
n.
1. A blow with the fist.
2. Impressive or effective force; impact. See Synonyms at vigor.
Phrasal Verbs:
punch in
1. To check in formally at a job upon arrival.
2. To enter data on a keypad or similar device.
punch out
1. To check out formally at a job upon departure.
2. To hit (someone) with a powerful punch, often so as to render unconscious.
3. Baseball To call (a batter) out on a third strike, often using a punching motion as a signal.
punch up
To enliven or enhance: punched up the report by adding some relevant cartoons.
Idioms:
beat to the punch
To make the first decisive move: a marketing team that beat all the competitors to the punch.
punch the clock
1. To register one's arrive or departure at a job.
2. To be employed at a job with regular hours.

[Middle English punchen, to thrust, prod, prick, from Old French poinçonner, ponchonner, to emboss with a punch, from poinçon, ponchon, pointed tool; see puncheon1.]

punch′less adj.

punch 3

 (pŭnch)
n.
A beverage of fruit juices and sometimes a soft drink or carbonated water, often spiced and mixed with a wine or liquor base.

[From Hindi pañc-, five, probably as used in pañcāmr̥t, a mixture of milk, yogurt, ghee, sugar, and honey used in Hindu ritual, from Sanskrit pañcāmṛtam : pañca, five; see penkwe in Indo-European roots + amṛtam, amrita.]

Punch

 (pŭnch)
n.
The quarrelsome hook-nosed husband of Judy in the comic puppet show Punch and Judy.
Idiom:
pleased as Punch
Highly pleased; gratified.

[Short for Punchinello.]
Translations

punching

:
punching bag
n (US) = punchbag
punching power (Boxing) → Schlagkraft f
References in classic literature ?
They were striking about them with their swords and with their left fists, punching every head they could reach.
`Same as if he had a bone in his throat,' said the Gryphon: and it set to work shaking him and punching him in the back.
He neither slackened nor quickened his pace, but jogged forward merrily, whistling as he came, and beating time by punching holes in the dusty road with the stout pike-staff in his hand.
Wardle, each vying with the other in paying zealous and unremitting attentions to the old lady, crowded round her easy-chair, one holding her ear-trumpet, another an orange, and a third a smelling-bottle, while a fourth was busily engaged in patting and punching the pillows which were arranged for her support.
There was a sudden crash and the car came to a halt, and the ingot toppled out upon a moving platform, where steel fingers and arms seized hold of it, punching it and prodding it into place, and hurrying it into the grip of huge rollers.
She did not finish, for by this time she was bending down and punching under the bed with the broom, and so she needed breath to punctuate the punches with.
Whereupon my young friend very properly prepares to punch the head of the boy at the cigar emporium next door; but fails in the attempt, the boy at the cigar emporium next door punching his instead.