punctum


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

punctum

(ˈpʌŋktəm)
n, pl -tums or -ta (-tə)
1. (Anatomy) anatomy a tip or small point
2. (Mathematics) obsolete a mathematical point
3. obsolete a small unit of time
4. obsolete the essence of something
5. (Zoology) zoology botany med a small dot or rounded mark
6. (Grammar) grammar obsolete a full stop
7. (Music, other) (in early music) an inflection used at the end of a chant
8. (Music, other) (in early music) a neume
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.punctum - (anatomy) a point or small area
anatomy, general anatomy - the branch of morphology that deals with the structure of animals
point - the precise location of something; a spatially limited location; "she walked to a point where she could survey the whole street"
References in classic literature ?
I have plenty of ideas and facts, you know, and I can see he is just the man to put them into shape--remembers what the right quotations are, omne tulit punctum, and that sort of thing--gives subjects a kind of turn.
In this section of this essay, I argue Barthes's concept of punctum offers a lens to analyze visual enthymemes.
Hay, por ejemplo, un analisis de los diferentes montajes visuales de una foto emblematica de Evita y tambien una lectura critica de los versos montados unos sobre otros (amontonados o encabalgados) del poema Punctum. Por medio del montaje, entonces, estas obras, iluminan zonas o lecturas de lo popular que por ser "contraclimaticas" hubieran generado rispideces o controversias en sus contextos de emergencia.
(2) The most commonly observed clinical features consist of epiphora with discharge (85-94%), pouting punctum (72-75%), conjunctivitis, eyelid matting, and punctual regurgitation of concretions under syringing (75%).
The distinction between studium and punctum is "the order of liking, not loving" (Barthes 1981a:27).
Besides the above findings, the present study also revealed that 77.2% of the study participants closed their eyes, but only 2.2% of them occluded their punctum route for at least two minutes during the administration procedure.
She uses these statues as Barthian punctum, a point of entry into late medieval culture.
So while a medical story is being laid out, there is also what Barthes calls the punctum, the evocative detail that elevates the reportage to something more like poetry.
(1,2,3) The clinical signs are punctal or canalicular edema, redness, and purulent discharge from the punctum when pressure is applied.
Our first paper, Marion Steel's fascinating 'Daring to Play: Art, Life and Therapy, from Heidegger to Gadamer, by way of Barthes' Punctum and the Paintings of Paul Klee', was the opening Keynote of the Conference.
The inner mechanisms of Anna's encounter with the other through her photographic lens will be analysed by merging Levinas' theory of the trace of the other with Benjamin's (1999) theory of the optical unconscious and Barthes' ([1980] 2000) photographic concept of the punctum. The interconnection of these theories will reveal that, though Max's totalising movement inwards prevails throughout the novel, his self-containment is momentarily disrupted since, through Anna's pictures, he will find himself immersed within another space in which a movement towards alterity, imbued by a sense of ethical hospitality, is made possible.