punditocracy

punditocracy

a group of powerful and influential political commentators

pun·di·to·cra·cy

 (pŭn′dĭ-tŏk′rə-sē)
n. pl. pun·di·toc·ra·cies
A group of pundits who wield great political influence.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 'punditocracy' is most off the mark in assessing or discussing critical parameters of the economic situation: the fall in the rupee, the knock-on impact on the stock market as well as on growth and inflation, and the sharp increase in the country's debt stock.
It unites Parliament and even the punditocracy. Brexit is a national humiliation.
However great or modest that change may have been, it was more than anything the institutional punditocracy had been able to accomplish in living memory.
The leftist punditocracy at the New York Times, Washington Post, CNN, and the rest of the Fake News cabal echo these smears with a continuous flood of stories and op-eds likening Trump to Hitler and Mussolini, and label-lynching him and his followers with the usual defamatory tags: Nazi, neo-Nazi, fascist, white nationalist, white supremacist, racist, anti-Semite, xenophobe, anti-immigrant, etc.
Cohen noted, "Even damnation is poisoned with rainbows." Rather than accept that some existing ACA provisions might make it into a new design, the punditocracy pounced, pointing to a broken campaign promise to repeal and replace.
The punditocracy's lead Muslim-baiter, Pamela Geller, instandy predicted Shariah, terrorism, and persecution of Jews in Hamtramck's future.
The late Kevin Barnhurst and his graduate students spent decades meticulously and laboriously documenting changes in journalistic formats, almost always defying common wisdom and the punditocracy. This ambitious and fascinating book is his attempt, released just after his untimely death, to pull together all that work into one place and provide an analysis that could explain a truly puzzling pattern.
The punditocracy almost uniformly came down hard on Clinton, recognising the report confirmed she broke federal rules and lied about her conduct.
With two very different populist voter uprisings lifting the presidential candidacies of Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump, one could see Lee as an appropriately fatuous proxy for the out-of-touch punditocracy that failed to predict them, too wrapped up in the inside-baseball shadow plays of finance and politics to realize how profoundly policies and market dips affect real people.
Yet the punditocracy has been predicting Trump's collapse with blind certainty from the very beginning.
Much of the political class jumped to the governor's defense, including a lot of people in politics and the punditocracy who ordinarily disagree with him.