puny

(redirected from punier)
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pu·ny

 (pyo͞o′nē)
adj. pu·ni·er, pu·ni·est
1. Of inferior size, strength, or significance; weak: a puny physique; puny excuses.
2. Chiefly Southern US Sickly; ill.

[Variant of puisne.]

pu′ni·ly adv.
pu′ni·ness n.

puny

(ˈpjuːnɪ)
adj, -nier or -niest
1. having a small physique or weakly constitution
2. paltry; insignificant
[C16: from Old French puisne puisne]
ˈpunily adv
ˈpuniness n

pu•ny

(ˈpyu ni)

adj. -ni•er, -ni•est.
1. of less than normal size and strength; weak.
2. unimportant; insignificant: a puny excuse.
[1540–50; orig. sp. variant of puisne]
pu′ni•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.puny - inferior in strength or significance; "a puny physique"; "puny excuses"
weak - wanting in physical strength; "a weak pillar"
2.puny - (used especially of persons) of inferior size
little, small - limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a little dining room"; "a little house"; "a small car"; "a little (or small) group"

puny

adjective
1. feeble, weak, frail, little, tiny, weakly, stunted, diminutive, sickly, undeveloped, pint-sized (informal), undersized, underfed, dwarfish, pygmy or pigmy Our Kevin has always been a puny lad.
feeble strong, powerful, healthy, robust, hefty (informal), sturdy, burly, husky (informal), well-developed, well-built, brawny
2. insignificant, minor, petty, inferior, trivial, worthless, trifling, paltry, inconsequential, piddling (informal) the puny resources at our disposal

puny

adjective
2. Conspicuously deficient in quantity, fullness, or extent:
Slang: measly.
Translations
ضَعيف البُنْيَه، هَزيل
drobnýneduživý
lillesvag
veiklulegur
menkutis
sīksvārgulīgs
çelimsizmecalsiz

puny

[ˈpjuːnɪ] ADJ (punier (compar) (puniest (superl))) → enclenque, endeble

puny

[ˈpjuːni] adj
(physically) [person, arms] → chétif/ive
(= derisory) [effort] → dérisoire; [number, amount] → dérisoire

puny

adj (+er) (= weak) personschwächlich, mick(e)rig (pej); effortkläglich; resourceskläglich, winzig

puny

[ˈpjuːnɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (person) → gracile, striminzito/a; (effort) → penoso/a

puny

(ˈpjuːni) adjective
small and weak. a puny child.
ˈpunily adverb
ˈpuniness noun
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