punster


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pun·ster

 (pŭn′stər)
n.
A maker of puns.

punster

(ˈpʌnstə)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a person who is fond of making puns, esp one who makes a tedious habit of this

pun•ster

(ˈpʌn stər)

n.
one who makes puns frequently.
[1690–1700]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.punster - someone overly fond of making puns
humorist, humourist - someone who acts speaks or writes in an amusing way
Translations

punster

[ˈpʌnstəʳ] Npersona f aficionada a los juegos de palabras, equivoquista mf

punster

n he is a brilliant punsterer versteht es hervorragend, Wortspiele zu machen
References in periodicals archive ?
An impulsive punster and quick-witted, he dubbed The Star's most prolific columnist, Kaleem Omar, 'Column Omar'.
Some readers will not recognize the compulsive quibbler, punster, stage manager, and explainer we know as Hamlet.
Thus, it might be said that every punster is a credit to his race--and in a race to his credit!
A wordsmith and punster, he enjoyed writing limericks and other poetry.
As Shakespeare was already an inveterate punster, the book is almost too much of a muchness, best consumed in small quantities.
Kate Klise's 43 Old Cemetery Road: The Loch Ness Punster (9780544313378, $15.99) is Book Seven in the series and offers up a pun-filled adventure replete with wordplay and action.
Tombaugh, discoverer of Pluto and the solar system's 'third zone.' Adelle and Muron's boy, Patricia's husband, Annette and Alden's father, astronomer, teacher, punster, and friend: Clyde W.
He is a master punster. I stole this line from him to make this column work.
Durnell described his younger brother "an an absolutely caring, giving, loving person - and he was probably a better punster that any of us could hope to be.
So many regulars have contributed to the Wednesday page - my Kirkcaldy correspondent Wee Jimmy, Hamilton's No.1 punster Bob McFarlane and competition diehards such as John Bruce, Stevie Newton, the Collins family and Gerry Milligan, to name but a few.
I say superiority rather than excellence, for if modern puns imply a contest of wits in which the punster proves his verbal superiority over his rivals, (87) how much more pronounced must this implication have been for the agonistic Greeks, who engaged in such verbal sparring during symposia, and for their rhapsodes, who performed competitively?
Dubbed 'the grafter with laughter' - most likely by himself - Ian is a paid-up punster who pinballs everywhere, bristling with sheer nervous energy and saying ludicrous, slappable things like, "If the customer's in doubt they give me a shout and I sort them out, that's what it's all about."