pupilage

pu·pil·age

 (pyo͞o′pə-lĭj)
n.
The state or period of being a pupil.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Here was Miss Edwards, who only paid a small premium which had been spent long ago, every day outshining and excelling the baronet's daughter, who learned all the extras (or was taught them all) and whose half-yearly bill came to double that of any other young lady's in the school, making no account of the honour and reputation of her pupilage. Therefore, and because she was a dependent, Miss Monflathers had a great dislike to Miss Edwards, and was spiteful to her, and aggravated by her, and, when she had compassion on little Nell, verbally fell upon and maltreated her as we have already seen.
When I approached the Doctor's cottage - a pretty old place, on which he seemed to have expended some money, if I might judge from the embellishments and repairs that had the look of being just completed - I saw him walking in the garden at the side, gaiters and all, as if he had never left off walking since the days of my pupilage. He had his old companions about him, too; for there were plenty of high trees in the neighbourhood, and two or three rooks were on the grass, looking after him, as if they had been written to about him by the Canterbury rooks, and were observing him closely in consequence.
The pupil had been, in her state of pupilage, so imbued with the class-custom of stretching out an arm, as if to hail a cab or omnibus, whenever she found she had an observation on hand to offer to Miss Peecher, that she often did it in their domestic relations; and she did it now.
(5 Pet.) 1, 17 (1831) ("Meanwhile they are in a state of pupilage. Their relation to the United States resembles that of a ward to his guardian.
'After being appointed as magistrates, they served four-month pupilage under seasoned senior magistrates.
Lawyer Abdinoor Ismael, a graduate of Kenya School of Law undergoing pupilage, received over Sh100 million that the ATPU believes has been used to finance terrorist activities.
Such court will include the high court, court of Appeal or Supreme Court and only a lawyer who have completed pupilage can have such rights of audience in courts of unlimited Jurisdiction .
"[I]f a tone of self-glorification be encouraged in them," she warns, those "at the present time in a state of barbarism [...] will become emasculate," an emasculation that would render the barbarian "utterly incapable of [the] hard application and docile reverence which is essential to all who are in the condition of pupilage, and who would attain instruction of any degree of intrinsic worth" ("Civilisation" 444).
The word "pupilage" is used by Chief Justice Marshall in 1831 to classify the relationship of the Cherokee Indians to the United States--"a relationship that resembles that of a ward (the Indian) to his guardian (the United States)".
According to Bruce Ackerman, the "constitutional moment" [ix] arrived in 1963, where one was only required to have a law degree followed by a guided pupilage, and the rest as the saying would go, 'see you in Court'.
Meanwhile they are in a state of pupilage. Their relation co the United States resembles that of a ward to his guardian.
During my pupilage (when you train to become an advocate) I was advised to resign my job and get an overdraft from the bank.