purple loosestrife


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purple loosestrife

n.
A perennial plant (Lythrum salicaria) native to Eurasia, having long spikes of purple flowers. It is naturalized in North America and often forms dense stands in wetlands.

pur′ple loose′strife


n.
an Old World wetland plant, Lythrumsalicaria, of the loosestrife family, having spikes of reddish purple flowers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.purple loosestrife - marsh herb with a long spike of purple flowerspurple loosestrife - marsh herb with a long spike of purple flowers; originally of Europe but now rampant in eastern United States
genus Lythrum, Lythrum - loosestrife
loosestrife - any of numerous herbs and subshrubs of the genus Lythrum
References in periodicals archive ?
Pretty, indeed - but it turned out this was actually purple loosestrife, an invasive species that threatens native plants and, consequently, the wildlife that depend on those plants.
Many types of waterfowl will also avoid wetlands choked with purple loosestrife as it does not provide adequate nesting cover.
Nid llysiau'r milwr coch (Lythrum salicaria; purple loosestrife) ydi hwn; ym mis Mehefin y bydd llysiau'r milwr coch yn dechrau blodeuo.
Purple loosestrife (Lythrum virgatum) earns its keep for its strong, upright form and long blooming season, but it needs ample summer water.
While parks devote scarce resources to fighting a plant such as purple loosestrife, for example, it's still available in some nurseries and is even planted in some roadside beautification projects because it's an attractive plant.
For example, purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) grows in dense infestations that displace native plant communities.
Such pests include European purple loosestrife, which now grows in 48 states and costs $45 million a year to control.
Purple loosestrife, for example, a flowering-herb turned noxious weed that arrived from Europe in the 19th century, now chokes waterways in 48 states and cost $45 million per year to control, to a Cornell study.
The plants used in this study included the purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), the common cattail (Tyhpa sp.), and a common wetland grass (Panicum sp.).
It belongs to the same family as the notoriously invasive purple loosestrife, which is choking out natives on stream banks across the country.
We stayed away from pretty but non-native invasive plants like purple loosestrife and Japanese honeysuckle.