purple passage


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.purple passage - a passage full of ornate and flowery language
passage - a section of text; particularly a section of medium length
References in classic literature ?
For so John Barleycorn tricks and lures, setting the maggots of intelligence gnawing, whispering his fatal intuitions of truth, flinging purple passages into the monotony of one's days.
Until 1959 the publisher of a book which contained any purple passage which might have a 'tendency to deprave and corrupt those whose minds are open to such immoral influences' was liable to imprisonment.
Lawrence at Work: The Emergence of the Prussian Officer Stories (1988), the effort at extending the ending pushed the young writer dangerously close to a "purple passage." At the same time, this ending reveals Lawrence striving toward language reminiscent of the "Foreword" to Sons and Lovers.
During one purple passage Hendry outscored his Wiltshire rival 325 points to nil, including breaks of78,46 and 110.
The purple passage on the euro accounted for just four sentences in a 54-minute speech.
A purple passage is their candid discussion of the resurrection, closely argued through analyses of Paul and the gospels, showing what happens when we stress either the unity or the separateness of the pre and post-Easter Jesus.
I was not in the least insulted when, having read to a Los Angeles audience one of My own favorite compositions, a shamelessly purple passage about my impressions of the Basilica at Venice, somebody in the front row asked: "D'ya have to pay to get into that church?" It was a perfectly legitimate question, but it was addressed to the wrong sort of writer.
In a purple passage at the end of the play in which the defrocked expriapic parson indulges in a soliloquylike, apparently serious diatribe against typical Australian gods ("worshipping suns, yachts, monuments, money and beaches"), we recognize the old White out to denounce a crass, materialistic society where God is dead.
Stern told her extraordinary story in Purple Passage: The Life of Mrs.
He will try the doors of our houses to see if we have forgotten to turn the key in the lock.' In another purple passage they remind us that "young black America walks the streets with ears pressed against a jambox so big and heavy most whites couldn't even lift it.' Their racial stereotyping is both offensive and completely irrelevant to their topic.
For on occasion good writers do write prose devoid of purple passages, and in any case, it may be that the style of the Magna Moralia reflects the purpose for which the treatise was written: that is, the Magna Moralia may be lecture notes for an introductory course in ethics.
Though fanciful, these modifications are in keeping with the character of the text itself, which is filled with purple passages and makes no pretense at objectivity.