purslane


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purs·lane

 (pûrs′lĭn, -lān′)
n.
A trailing plant (Portulaca oleracea) native to Eurasia, having small yellow flowers, reddish stems, and fleshy obovate leaves that can be cooked as a vegetable or used in salads.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman *purcelane, alteration of Latin portulāca, porcilāca; see portulaca.]

purslane

(ˈpɜːslɪn; -leɪn)
n
1. (Plants) a weedy portulacaceous plant, Portulaca oleracea, with small yellow flowers and fleshy leaves, which are used in salads and as a potherb
2. (Cookery) a weedy portulacaceous plant, Portulaca oleracea, with small yellow flowers and fleshy leaves, which are used in salads and as a potherb
3. (Plants) any of various similar or related plants, such as sea purslane and water purslane
[C14 purcelane, from Old French porcelaine, from Late Latin porcillāgō, from Latin porcillāca, variant of portulāca]

purs•lane

(ˈpɜrs leɪn, -lɪn)

n.
any low, trailing plant of the genus Portulaca, of the purslane family, esp. P. oleracea, having yellow flowers, used as a salad plant and potherb.
[1350–1400; Middle English purcelan(e) < Middle French porcelaine < Late Latin porcillāginem, acc. of porcillāgō, for Latin porcillāca]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.purslane - a plant of the family Portulacaceae having fleshy succulent obovate leaves often grown as a potherb or salad herbpurslane - a plant of the family Portulacaceae having fleshy succulent obovate leaves often grown as a potherb or salad herb; a weed in some areas
common purslane, Portulaca oleracea, pussley, pussly, verdolagas - weedy trailing mat-forming herb with bright yellow flowers cultivated for its edible mildly acid leaves eaten raw or cooked especially in Indian and Greek and Middle Eastern cuisine; cosmopolitan
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Translations
Sommer-Portulak
쇠비름
References in classic literature ?
I have made a satisfactory dinner, satisfactory on several accounts, simply off a dish of purslane (Portulaca oleracea) which I gathered in my cornfield, boiled and salted.
Purslane is a weed that is common in vegetable gardens, and that's a great place for it because it is delicious.
The first was Not French Onion Soup - an incredibly delicate starter of tofu, slow-cooked onions, miso, sea purslane, onion oil, pickled shallots and dashi.
My favorites included a Stone Fruit Salad (with purslane, burrata, blackberries, charred cucumber, and peach vinaigrette), an extensive global cheese course, and an Alaskan halibut (with fava beans, chanterelle mushrooms, and a corn dashi emulsion).
As I pull purslane from my vegetable garden, carefully placing every remnant of foliage and root (no matter how microscopic) in a bucket destined for disposal in a nearby hazmat depository where the purslane will probably thrive, I consider the fact that I never encounter, say, a cherry seedling pushing up out of the soil, or an unexpected heirloom pepper plant emerging to join its hybrid cousins.
Ingredients 250g dry anchovies Spring onion (bundle) or 1 white onion Green chilli 2 tablespoons water 1 tablespoon ghee or butter 1 teaspoon cumin powder Salt (to taste) Red chilli powder 1 teaspoon black pepper Lemon (up to your taste) Purslane leaves (two bundles) 1 green mango (optional) Preparation Clean dry anchovies by removing heads and tails.
Extraction of irradiated purslane plant at 9 kGy by methanol (50%) considered the effective one to obtained natural phenolic acid compounds; which were identified by HPLC to twenty four components.
Portulacaceae), known as common Purslane is an annual succulent herb found abundantly all over the valley of Manipur in moist damp habitats.
A canape-sized sarnie of smoked crab sat alongside spanking fresh white meat mayo and a bon-bon of the brown, the whole thing lubricated by dill oil and thoughtfully garnished with sea purslane and wafer-thin slices of preserved lemon.
HENRY THOREAU WAS FOND OF eating purslane and consumed it frequently during his Walden Pond experiment.
There was also a portion of Purslane (or in Greek Glistrida), again coming with a medical certification for healthiness as it's is loaded with Omega 3 fatty acids and vitamin A plus C and a good dose of iron that also tastes very good.
Rocket and lamb's lettuce can be sown in most situations, while winter purslane prefers lighter soil.