pursuer


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pur·sue

 (pər-so͞o′)
v. pur·sued, pur·su·ing, pur·sues
v.tr.
1. To follow in an effort to overtake or capture; chase: a fox that was pursued by hounds.
2. To strive to gain or accomplish: pursue lofty political goals.
3. To proceed along the course of; follow: a ship that pursued the southern course.
4.
a. To carry further; advance: Let's not pursue this argument.
b. To take action regarding (something), especially with the intention of sustained effort: a detective who pursued each lead.
c. To engage in (a vocation or hobby, for example); practice.
5. To try to have a romantic relationship with: a lady who was pursued by many suitors.
6. To continue to torment or afflict; haunt: was pursued by the demons of lust and greed.
v.intr.
1. To follow in an effort to overtake or capture; chase.
2. To take action regarding something or carry on an established activity or project.

[Middle English purseuen, pursuen, from Anglo-Norman purseure, pursure, from Vulgar Latin *prōsequere, from Latin prōsequī; see prosecute.]

pur·su′a·ble adj.
pur·su′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pursuer - a person who is pursuing and trying to overtake or capturepursuer - a person who is pursuing and trying to overtake or capture; "always before he had been able to outwit his pursuers"
bounty hunter - someone who pursues fugitives or criminals for whom a reward is offered
follower - someone who travels behind or pursues another
2.pursuer - a person who pursues some plan or goal; "a pursuer of truth"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Translations
مُتابِع، مُلاحِق، مُطارِد
-kapronásledovatel
forfølger
sá sem eltir, leitarmaîur
takipçi

pursuer

[pəˈsjuːəʳ] Nperseguidor(a) m/f

pursuer

[pərˈsjuːər] npoursuivant(e) m/f

pursuer

nVerfolger(in) m(f)

pursuer

[pəˈsjuːəʳ] ninseguitore/trice

pursue

(pəˈsjuː) verb
1. to follow especially in order to catch or capture; to chase. They pursued the thief through the town.
2. to occupy oneself with (studies, enquiries etc); to continue. He is pursuing his studies at the University.
purˈsuer noun
pursuit (pəˈsjuːt) noun
1. the act of pursuing. The thief ran down the street with a policeman in (hot) pursuit.
2. an occupation or hobby. holiday pursuits.
References in classic literature ?
SEEING a ship sailing by upon the sea of politics, an Ambitious Person started in hot pursuit along the strand; but the people's eyes being fixed upon the Presidency no one observed the pursuer.
For an hour or more we watched our pursuer surging out nearer and nearer from amongst the squalls that sometimes hid her altogether.
A glance behind showed his pursuer within twenty yards, and preparing to launch his spear.
I had covered some hundred yards from shore when it became evident that my pursuer must grasp the stern of the skiff within the next half-dozen strokes.
White Fang had learned to turn suddenly upon the pursuer that was ahead of the pack and thoroughly to rip him up before the pack could arrive.
More than twenty times both the pursued and the pursuer glided by him, just without the reach of his oars, until he thought the best way to view the sport was to remain stationary, and, by watching a favorable opportunity, assist as much as he could in taking the victim.
My informer said, when he was pursuing an Indian, the man cried out for mercy, at the same time that he was covertly loosing the bolas from his waist, meaning to whirl it round his head and so strike his pursuer.
But, swift as was the Gump's flight, the pursued and pursuer moved more swiftly yet, and within a few moments were blotted out against the dim horizon.
To strike at him on any of these occasions would be to fell and disable him, but the pursuer cannot resolve to do that, and so the grimly ridiculous pursuit continues.
As I plunged into the reeds, my foremost pursuers emerged from the gap.
We shall need no barricades for we shall not linger in the tower," replied Gahan, moving more rapidly as he realized from the volume of sound behind them the great number of their pursuers.
Kantos Kan had shown me a trick of gearing, which is known only to the navy of Helium, that greatly increased the speed of our machines, so that I felt sure I could distance my pursuers if I could dodge their projectiles for a few moments.