pursuit plane


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Related to pursuit plane: fighter aircraft, Fighter planes, Fighter jets

pursuit plane

n.
A high-speed fighter plane, especially one from the early 1900s.

pursuit′ plane`


n.
(formerly) fighter (def. 2).
[1915–20]
Translations

pursuit plane

nJagdflugzeug nt
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References in periodicals archive ?
This pursuit plane was always a tractor, light, fast and very maneuverable and manned by one skilled pilot.
Built using plans, not from a kit, the plane is a replica of a P-26 Pea Shooter, the first all-metal pursuit plane produced in quantity for the U.
Schreckengost influenced industrial design in trucks the cab-over-engine truck), bicycles the Mercury bicycle), and toys the Pursuit Plane pedal car).
19) Therefore, Japanese aircraft might be spotted when about 130 or more miles from their targets, the American pursuit plane bases, locks, and dams, assuming the enemy carriers did not launch their aircraft closer to shore--an unlikely event because of the danger that the carriers themselves might be spotted.
It began in 1935 when he submitted the design for the XP-2 pursuit plane and ended in 1953 when he gave all the patents, trademarks, and goodwill of the Hughes Tool Company's Aircraft Division, along with all of the stock of the newly established Hughes Aircraft Company to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
American factories flailed to produce and ship a single pursuit plane to fight in France.
The total force numbered 701 pursuit planes, 366 observation planes, 323 day bombers, and 91 night bombers adding up to 1,481 aircraft for the largest air operation of the war.
How could Japan's torpedo planes, bombers, and strafers have eluded interception by more than 300 Army and Navy pursuit planes, the principal weapons for defending the base and the Fleet when in port?
Therefore, they lacked the power and lightweight characteristics required for use in bombers and pursuit planes.
Boy," Chennault soon declared, "if the Chinese only had 100 good pursuit planes [fighters] and 100 fair pilots, they'd exterminate the Jap air force.
He then proceeded to get completely lost, penetrating three layers of restricted airspace--"we have a system of systems"--becoming confused and falling to respond to several warnings by pursuit planes before finally answering.
In her 45 years of flying, Weigel - who divorced her husband, Edwin Weigel, in the late 1950s - piloted dozens of types of aircraft, including bombers, pursuit planes, transporters and target planes.