pursuit plane


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Related to pursuit plane: fighter aircraft, Fighter planes, Fighter jets

pursuit plane

n.
A high-speed fighter plane, especially one from the early 1900s.

pursuit′ plane`


n.
(formerly) fighter (def. 2).
[1915–20]
Translations

pursuit plane

nJagdflugzeug nt
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References in periodicals archive ?
This pursuit plane was always a tractor, light, fast and very maneuverable and manned by one skilled pilot.
Built using plans, not from a kit, the plane is a replica of a P-26 Pea Shooter, the first all-metal pursuit plane produced in quantity for the U.S.
Schreckengost influenced industrial design in trucks the cab-over-engine truck), bicycles the Mercury bicycle), and toys the Pursuit Plane pedal car).
(19) Therefore, Japanese aircraft might be spotted when about 130 or more miles from their targets, the American pursuit plane bases, locks, and dams, assuming the enemy carriers did not launch their aircraft closer to shore--an unlikely event because of the danger that the carriers themselves might be spotted.
It began in 1935 when he submitted the design for the XP-2 pursuit plane and ended in 1953 when he gave all the patents, trademarks, and goodwill of the Hughes Tool Company's Aircraft Division, along with all of the stock of the newly established Hughes Aircraft Company to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
Several times I have seen a ribbon-like trail in the sky behind an American pursuit plane. On one occasion I noticed that my motor, a Hispano-Suiza French-made, was giving out a trail of whitish-blue smoke which hung for some time in the perfectly still air.
American factories flailed to produce and ship a single pursuit plane to fight in France.
He described Parker as "a wiry Southerner, quick as a cat, who has flown all sorts of planes from pursuit planes to lumbering craft." According to Owen, no one wanted to be first more than did Admiral Byrd himself.
Army bombers and SE-5 pursuit planes armed with fragmentation bombs next took out the German Destroyer G-102 in what was called the "most spectacular of the entire series."
The total force numbered 701 pursuit planes, 366 observation planes, 323 day bombers, and 91 night bombers adding up to 1,481 aircraft for the largest air operation of the war.
How could Japan's torpedo planes, bombers, and strafers have eluded interception by more than 300 Army and Navy pursuit planes, the principal weapons for defending the base and the Fleet when in port?
Therefore, they lacked the power and lightweight characteristics required for use in bombers and pursuit planes. The major challenge, then, was to accomplish two goals: (1) enable the existing manufacturers to increase their capacity to a sufficient level that would allow them to continue producing these engines to meet the growing need of the aviation training program and (2) require the manufacturers to design and build an engine capable of supplying the necessary power to lift the heavier aircraft.