pursy


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pursy

(ˈpɜːsɪ)
adj
1. (Pathology) short-winded
2. archaic fat; overweight
[C15: alteration of earlier pursive, from Anglo-French porsif, ultimately from Latin pulsāre to pulsate]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pursy - breathing laboriously or convulsively
breathless, dyspneal, dyspneic, dyspnoeal, dyspnoeic - not breathing or able to breathe except with difficulty; "breathless at thought of what I had done"; "breathless from running"; "followed the match with breathless interest"
References in classic literature ?
The young man listened to this tale of wrong with all the seriousness that he could maintain; but at the sight of the pursy red-faced man and the dignity with which he bore him, the laughter came so thick upon him that he had to lean up against a tree-trunk.
"Meantime I know all about your affairs, and have just got information, by Brown's last letter, that you are said to be on the point of forming an advantageous match with a pursy, little Belgian schoolmistress--a Mdlle.
"I bear no love for that pursy Steward, but I thought that we had engaged to fight with one another and that it must be done."
People mutht be amuthed, Thquire, thomehow,' continued Sleary, rendered more pursy than ever, by so much talking; 'they can't be alwayth a working, nor yet they can't be alwayth a learning.
Pursy and important, he sat him down at the table, and many a dark word he threw out, of benefits to be expected to the convent, and high deeds of service done by himself, which, at another season, would have attracted observation.
I was still looking at the doorway, thinking that Miss Mowcher was a long while making her appearance, when, to my infinite astonishment, there came waddling round a sofa which stood between me and it, a pursy dwarf, of about forty or forty-five, with a very large head and face, a pair of roguish grey eyes, and such extremely little arms, that, to enable herself to lay a finger archly against her snub nose, as she ogled Steerforth, she was obliged to meet the finger half-way, and lay her nose against it.
When the Oxonian recounts crossing the English Channel on his way to Paris, for example, he describes a "pursy old woman" who, "by a sudden rock of the vessel," grabs the Oxonian by the throat for support: