push polling


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push polling

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the use of loaded questions in a supposedly objective telephone opinion poll during a political campaign in order to bias voters against an opposing candidate
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The leading pollster, John Curtis, has exposed that these results are from opinion polls using leading questions and poor methodology, so called 'push polling.' .' Properly conducted opinion polls show that people don't want another referendum by 48pc - 38pc.
The Tories also recently began "push polling" phone canvassing.
The less controversial method of push polling involves early polling about positive and negative characteristics of the candidates in order to determine which bits of information seem to change voters' candidate preferences.
What are the implications of push polling? How should campaigns use it to their advantage?
Bush, whose campaign has always denied any involvement in the ''push polling'' that propagated the smear.
PUSH POLLING -- asking voters questions designed to spread negative information about a candidate rather than to elicit voters' views -- is a despicable technique.
Push polling is one of the dirtier, yet mostly legal, tricks in a political operative's bag of last-minute campaign tools; robo-calling software makes it dirt cheap to place millions of calls to a single swing district.
About 10 years ago, the American Association of Political Consultants (AAPC) joined a variety of pollsters in condemning "push polling" which, AAPC claims, is "designed specifically to persuade." The fact is that many more polls than the AAPC references attempt to "cue" the respondents to particular opinions.
"Polling," advised TEAMMISSOURI, "should also be used to test potential lines of attack against your opponent." Candidates were advised not to confuse this strategy with "negative advocacy calls (sometimes called 'push polling')." The handbook was silent, however, on the ethics of such a tactic.
The result of this lens is that we have a sophisticated understanding of the intricacies of media buying, push polling, the techniques of consultants, the nuances of ad-making, and other tactical considerations.
Thus, a week or so before the primary, there was a two- or three-day flurry of interest in the charge by a woman in South Carolina that the Bush campaign was engaged in "push polling." This consists in telephoning the supporters of your rival and asking them, under the guise of seeking their opinion, if they know that their man is widely known to be a liar, a thief, and a child-molester.