pushfulness


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push·ful

 (po͝osh′fo͝ol′)
adj.
Pushing.

push′ful·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pushfulness

(ˈpʊʃfʊlnɪs)
n
informal US the quality of being offensively assertive or forceful
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

pushfulness

[ˈpʊʃfʊlnɪs] N (= dynamism) → empuje m, dinamismo m, espíritu m emprendedor; (= ambition) → ambición f (pej) → agresividad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
But one danger that we highlight is that a European central bank could be tempted to adopt the strategic role of developing threat strategies against, for example, certain types of wage pushfulness across the EMU area, or of seeing a role for itself in `punishing' deviations from the Stability Pact.
Yet Pound was innately attracted to ideals of timeless order as well, and there was a sense in which for him Fascism, with its cult of youth and dynamic pushfulness, was insufficiently hieratic to fulfil the needs of his nature, which was fundamentally religious.
He then seeks to account for the alternative measure of economic performance used earlier (the unemployment rate plus the current account deficit as percentage of gross domestic product) for the period 1985-89 using EWC in conjunction with a measure of local wage "pushfulness." The latter refers to the degree to which workplaces enjoy the capacity to undertake autonomous collective action in the wage-setting process in conjunction with whether the incentive structure facing workers is likely to lead them to do so.