putrescence


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pu·tres·cence

 (pyo͞o-trĕs′əns)
n.
1. A putrescent character or condition.
2. Putrid matter.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

putrescence

1. the state or process of rotting or putrefying.
2. rotting or putrefying matter. — putrescent, adj.
See also: Processes
1. the state or process of rotting or putrefying.
2. rotting or putrefying matter. — putrescent, adj.
See also: Decaying
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.putrescence - in a state of progressive putrefaction
putrefaction, rot - a state of decay usually accompanied by an offensive odor
2.putrescence - the quality of rotting and becoming putrid
unwholesomeness, morbidness, morbidity - the quality of being unhealthful and generally bad for you
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

putrescence

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

putrescence

[pjuːˈtresns] Npudrición f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
And so, to find the whiff of putrescence surrounding Jean-Luc Melenchon, the former French presidential candidate and leader of the extreme-left party, La France Insoumise, one only has to recall Melenchon's recent meeting with Jeremy Corbyn at the September 2018 Labour conference in Liverpool to appreciate the nature of the man.
He wrote that "minute particles suspended, which are the germs of various low-forms of life, long since revealed by the microscope, and regarded as merely accidental concomitants of putrescence" had now been shown by Pasteur to be its essential cause.
As Robert Hertz notes in his classic study of this practice, double burial treats the temporality of death as a zone of putrescence separating two bodies.
"Artaud described a city under the plague: decaying cadavers, the stench of putrescence, the delirium of those who were suffering, the frantic sex, the superstitious practices, the ceaseless parade of flagellators, the massacre of the Jews" but what fascinated Allendy and Artaud, he writes,
From Putrescence to Post-Mortem: Aesthetic Transformations in Victorian Burial Reform, Carleton University.
MACBEAN Two days before docking in The slave galley could be smelled, The putrescence of blood, faeces, vomit and rotting bodies, Wafting downwind, The smell of the dead....
It was a revolution based on Abd al-Wahhab's Jacobin-like hatred for the putrescence and deviationism that he perceived all about him -- hence his call to purge Islam of all its heresies and idolatries.
Rolfe note that many species in the genus Coprinus 'erect their caps, fructify, and deliquesce into a collapsed, black and semi-liquid mass, popularly regarded as a "horrible putrescence."' (15) This autophagic deliquescence is actually a reproductive strategy that disperses spores and returns water and nutrients to the environment for future generations.
AFP quoted a Hurghada hospital official as saying that the bodies, which were buried for an unknown period of time, "arrived at the morgue in a complete state of putrescence".