putrescent


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pu·tres·cent

 (pyo͞o-trĕs′ənt)
adj.
1. Becoming putrid; putrefying.
2. Of or relating to putrefaction.

[Latin putrēscēns, putrēscent-, present participle of putrēscere, to rot, inchoative of putrēre, to be rotten, from puter, putr-, rotten; see pū̆- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

putrescent

(pjuːˈtrɛsənt)
adj
1. (Biology) becoming putrid; rotting
2. (Biology) characterized by or undergoing putrefaction
[C18: from Latin putrescere to become rotten]
puˈtrescence n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pu•tres•cent

(pyuˈtrɛs ənt)

adj.
1. becoming putrid; undergoing putrefaction.
2. of or pertaining to putrefaction.
[1725–35; < Latin putrēscent- (s. of putrēscēns), present participle of putrēscere to rot]
pu•tres′cence, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.putrescent - becoming putrid; "a trail lined by putrescent carcasses"
stale - lacking freshness, palatability, or showing deterioration from age; "stale bread"; "the beer was stale"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

putrescent

[pjuːˈtresnt] ADJputrefacto
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

putrescent

adj (form)verwesend
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
A couple of hundred yards out of Baker Street I heard a yelping chorus, and saw, first a dog with a piece of putrescent red meat in his jaws coming headlong towards me, and then a pack of starving mongrels in pursuit of him.
So overpowering was it that it was easy to discover the source‹a mass of putrescent matter on the doorstep which in general outlines resembled a dog.
The Minority seeks to trigger investigations under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of the United States of America especially after a clearer picture is now emerging that the AkufoAddo Government stands complicit with top functionaries and cronies neck deep in the putrescent sleaze.
People have also observed the flower's scent as something close to 'decaying meat or putrescent fish.'
I have all the answers as a political historian and it's a putrescent vaudeville of ratiocinations but I shall be speaking to those facts very robustly and intrepidly so in the womb of time.
The OED further defines miasma as "noxious vapour rising from putrescent organic matter, marshland, etc.
You have perhaps heard about the section in which Goldman calls critics "failures as people" and "putrescent." You have, if you're lucky, read his scalpel-sharp dissection of The New York Times's then-chief critic Clive Barnes, and you have (even if you despise critics) bled a little sympathetic drop for Barnes as Goldman carves him into dog food.
After germination, I spray PlotSaver (mixture of putrescent egg, rosemary, and peppermint oils), which allows the plot to establish.
Numerous remaining roots of teeth 18, 13, 23, 24, 48 and teeth 16, 15, 14, 26, 38, 45 with extensive cavity caries and the putrescent pulp were observed.
The smell emanating from Rome's peripheral recesses is a mixture of sublime and putrescent odors--natural gas and sewers but also lemons and well-tended gardens--which marks the difference between its urban landscape and the chemical, smoky smell of industrial cities.
Reading about "putrescent juices," the "black vomit" and the "bloody flux"--or the purging and bloodletting undertaken to cure them--is perhaps best not done on a full stomach.