putting green

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putt·ing green

(pŭt′ĭng)
n.
1. The area at the end of a golf course fairway in which the hole is placed, having more closely mowed turf than the rest of the course.
2. An area in which to practice putting.

putting green

(ˈpʌtɪŋ)
n
1. (Golf) (on a golf course) the area of closely mown grass at the end of a fairway where the hole is
2. (Golf) an area of smooth grass with several holes for putting games

green

(grin)

adj. green•er, green•est. adj.
1. of the color of growing foliage, between yellow and blue in the spectrum: green leaves.
2. covered with herbage or foliage; verdant: green fields.
3. characterized by verdure: a green Christmas.
4. made of green leafy vegetables: a green salad.
5. not fully matured; unripe: green fruit.
6. unseasoned; not cured: green lumber.
7. immature in age or judgment; untrained; inexperienced: green recruits.
8. simple; unsophisticated; naive.
9. having a sickly or pale appearance: to turn green with fear.
10.
a. advocating or promoting environmentalism: green consumers.
b. environmentally sound or beneficial: green computers.
11. full of life and vigor; youthful: a green old age.
12. fresh, recent, or new: a green wound.
13. (of wine) having a flavor that is raw, harsh, and acid, due esp. to a lack of maturity.
14. freshly slaughtered or still raw: green meat.
15. not fired, as bricks or pottery.
16. (of cement or mortar) freshly set and not completely hardened.
n.
17. a color intermediate in the spectrum between yellow and blue, an effect of light with a wavelength between 500 and 570 nm: found in nature as the color of most grasses and leaves while growing.
18. a secondary color formed by the mixture of blue and yellow pigments.
19. green coloring matter, as paint or dye.
20. green material or clothing: dressed in green.
21. greens,
a. the leaves and stems of certain plants, as spinach, kale, or lettuce, eaten as a vegetable.
b. fresh leaves or branches of trees, shrubs, etc., used for decoration.
22. grassy land; a plot of grassy ground.
23. a piece of grassy ground constituting a town or village common.
24. Also called putting green. the area of closely cropped grass surrounding each hole on a golf course.
26. a shooting range for archery.
27. Informal. green light (def. 1).
28. Slang. money; greenbacks (usu. prec. by the).
v.i., v.t.
29. to become or make green.
Idioms:
green with envy, extremely jealous.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English grēne, c. Old Frisian grēne, Old Saxon grōni, Old High German gruoni, Old Norse grønn; akin to grow]
green′ly, adv.
green′ness, n.

Green

(grin)

n.
1. John Richard, 1837–83, English historian.
2. Paul Eliot, 1894–1981, U.S. playwright.
3. William, 1873–1952, U.S. labor leader.
4. a river flowing S from W Wyoming to join the Colorado River in SE Utah. 730 mi. (1175 km) long.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.putting green - an area of closely cropped grass surrounding the hole on a golf courseputting green - an area of closely cropped grass surrounding the hole on a golf course; "the ball rolled across the green and into the bunker"
golf course, links course - course consisting of a large landscaped area for playing golf
land site, site - the piece of land on which something is located (or is to be located); "a good site for the school"
Translations

putting green

n (Golf) → kleiner Rasenplatz zum Putten; (= green)Grün nt
References in classic literature ?
In the far distance the red flag was waving on one of the putting greens.
I decline to talk upon the putting green," she said.
Also included are green fees on the nine-hole course, unlimited use of the putting greens and practice nets and use of the golf driving range.
shortg0lfTM can be played indoors, outdoors, daytime, nighttime, on carpet, synthetic turf, greens, practice or course putting greens and surrounding areas (where permitted).
Golfing champions Rory McIlroy, Tiger Woods and Luke Donald had not even teed off when the claxon sounded signaling the suspension of the opening match of the Accenture Match Play Championship, as a blizzard turned the putting greens into white before their amazed eyes, the Mirror reports.
Golfers and golf course superintendents expect a lot from their putting greens.
Since the greens are artificial, they don't require the typical lawn maintenance that natural putting greens need, such as watering, fertilising, weeding and mowing.
A better understanding of ecosystem services in putting greens may provide insights into reducing pesticide inputs.
Scott Macpherson, from the Edinburgh firm Turner Macpherson golf design, entrusted with designing the second course at Close House, said: "It is beneficial to the game, and particularly the art of putting, if putting greens are smooth.
Performance-tested synthetic grass systems allow putting greens to be used as a viable teaching aid, and not just a novelty item for one's backyard.
However, some studies (Quian and Follet 2002) reported that total C sequestration continued for up to ~31 years in fairways, and 45 years in putting greens.
If you have never seen the new synthetic putting greens and lawn grasses, the idea of artificial lawns will probably conjure up AstroTurf, the tacky green carpet first used in the 1960s in sports stadiums, gas station landscaping, and miniature golf courses.