pyrexia


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Related to pyrexia: Pyrexia of unknown origin

py·rex·i·a

 (pī-rĕk′sē-ə)
n.
Fever.

[New Latin, from Greek purexis, from puressein, to have a fever, from puretos, fever; see pyretic.]

py·rex′i·al, py·rex′ic adj.

pyrexia

(paɪˈrɛksɪə)
n
(Pathology) a technical name for fever
[C18: from New Latin, from Greek purexis, from puressein to be feverish, from pur fire]
pyˈrexial, pyˈrexic adj

fe•ver

(ˈfi vər)

n.
1. an abnormally high body temperature.
2. any of various diseases in which high temperature is a prominent symptom, as scarlet fever or rheumatic fever.
3. intense nervous excitement: in a fever of anticipation.
v.t.
4. to affect with or as if with fever.
v.i.
5. to become feverish; have or get a fever.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English fefer < Latin febris fever]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pyrexia - a rise in the temperature of the bodypyrexia - a rise in the temperature of the body; frequently a symptom of infection
symptom - (medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease
hyperpyrexia - extremely high fever (especially in children)
Translations

py·rex·i·a

n. pirexia, condición febril.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1: The portrayal of clinical markers of bovine tropical theileriosis of 21 calves Clinical markers Recorded Number of calves percentage (%) revealed Lymph nodes enlargement 100 21/21 Pallor MM 90.48 19/21 Reduced appetite 90.48 19/21 Pyrexia (40-42[degrees]C) 85.71 18/21 Pica 66.67 14/21 Coughing and respiratory 66.67 14/21 distress Lacrimation 66.67 14/21 Exophthalmia 52.38 11/21 Petechiae and/or ecchymoses 47.62 10/21 Lateral Recumbency 38.10 08/21 Submandibular or Ventral 38.10 08/21 edema Diarrhea 14.29 03/21 Melena 9.52 02/21 Haemoglobinuria 9.52 02/21 Jaundice (yellow) MM 9.52 02/21
AEs occurring in three or more patients included abdominal pain, headache, nasopharyngitis, pyrexia, and vomiting.
The clinical signs disappeared and pyrexia was controlled in all the animals within 3 days of treatment (Sumathi and Veena, 2012).Blood smear examination after 4th day blood smear examination revealed complete absence of piroplasm in erythrocytes.
The most common ADRs seen in clinical studies (frequency >= 10% of patients) were pyrexia, headache, cough, nasopharyngitis, vomiting, arthralgia and limb injury.
The most common Grade greater than or equal to3 treatment-emergent adverse events were neutropenia, diarrhea, colitis, pneumonia, rash and pyrexia. These data build upon the previously reported positive DUO results and further support oral duvelisib monotherapy as an effective oral treatment option for patients with relapsed or refractory CLL/SLL.
In addition, the most common adverse events observed in the eribulin group were neutropenia, anaemia, pyrexia, and fatigue/asthenia, which was consistent with the known side-effect profile of eribulin.
It is characterized by fetid red-brown watery uterine discharge along with pyrexia (Drillich et al., 2001), reduced milk yield, dullness, inappetance or anorexia, elevated heart rate and apparent dehydration.
In part II, 40 to 50 patients on ACZ885 (80%) reported adverse events, mainly arthralgia, cough, pyrexia and nasopharyngitis against 35-50 (70%) placebo patients previously treated with ACZ885.
The most frequent treatment-related adverse events were nausea, peripheral edema, headache, and pyrexia; 8% had infections and 3% had neutropenia deemed treatment-related.
In this study, the most common treatment-emergent adverse events (incidence greater than or equal to 25%) in patients treated with eribulin were fatigue, neutropenia, nausea, alopecia, constipation, peripheral neuropathy, abdominal pain, and pyrexia, which is consistent with the known side-effect profile of eribulin.
A three year old non-descript male dog was presented with the complaint of pyrexia, anorexia and vomiting since three days.