pyroelectric


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py·ro·e·lec·tric

 (pī′rō-ĭ-lĕk′trĭk)
adj.
Relating to or exhibiting pyroelectricity.
n.
A pyroelectric material.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pyroelectric

(ˌpaɪrəʊɪˈlɛktrɪk)
adj
(General Physics) of, concerned with, or exhibiting pyroelectricity
n
(General Physics) a pyroelectric substance
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Adj.1.pyroelectric - relating to or exhibiting pyroelectricity
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Summary: Lithium tantalite crystal possessing disparate characteristics pertaining to piezoelectric, optical and pyroelectric have excellent mechanical properties and high optical damage threshold.
Giant pyroelectric and piezoelectric constants up to 2,000 pC/N for specific morphologies and stress/strain conditions were evidenced and various porous polymer systems were further developed in the literature [21-25].
The Centauri's dual channel capabilities enable the user to simply plug in any of Ophir's thermal, pyroelectric or photodiode sensors and measure the two channels independently or in comparison to each other.
Wong, Pyroelectric properties of BiFeO3 ceramics prepared by a modified solid, Appl.
Products on display include: Count single photon counting modules (<10 photons); electrooptical modulators (LiNbO3); infrared detectors (pyroelectric, lead-salt, and thermopile); laser diode modules (including 03.3mm); laser optics including high LDT coatings; laser safety curtains, goggles, and screens; narrow line width lasers (500Hz); optical amplifiers (CW Yt, Er, Th, and pulsed Er); fibre lasers (CW Yt, Raman, Er, Th, BB, and pulsed: UV, green, Yt, Er, Th); optical filters (SWP, LWP, NBP, and NBW); optomechanical hardware; position sensing detectors; silicon and InGaAs APDs and PIN photodiodes; UV LEDs (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C); and UV photodiodes (SiC, UV enhanced Si).
Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, developed a thin film that uses pyroelectric energy conversion to turn low-quality waste heat into electricity.
Pascal-delannoy, "RF magnetron-sputtering deposition of pyroelectric lithium tantalate thin films on ruthenium dioxide," Journal of Crystal Growth, vol.
At present, the most widely used thermoelectric materials are carbon fiber-reinforced cement composite materials, cement-based composite materials, pyroelectric materials, and so on.
The TWC technique is based on the conversion of part of or all of the optical energy into heat by a metallic light absorber, where this process within a metal can give rise to a pyroelectric (PE) signal, by a pyroelectric sensor, polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF), which is in contact with the sample.