quadriliteral


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quadriliteral

(ˌkwɒdrɪˈlɪtərəl)
n
(Grammar) a four-letter word
adj
(Grammar) (of a word) having four letters
References in periodicals archive ?
A particularly fascinating feature of the verbal morphology of ANA is the division of the Quadriliteral verbs in ANA into two classes (pp.
As he shows, Arabic employs its own range of flexible internal resources, from the unassimilated bare forms of the Pidgins, through the hybrid paradigms of Cypriot, Maltese, and Uzbeki, to the traditional Semitic Stem II and Quadriliteral patterns, the latter structurally equivalent to Stem II, as Holes noted in his contribution to the 2004 festschrift for Manfred Woidich.
96, standing for quadriliteral verbs), respectively, are explained, or to have included them in "Abbreviations and Symbols" on p.
122) he states "This root is effectively quadriliteral and declines like pa"el, which takes the prefix /ni-/, e.
It is well known that reduplication serves as a root formation process in creating quadriliteral (and quintiliteral) roots in Semitic.
69) Nouns from these roots are built according to the standard quadriliteral nominal patterns.
because the rules of morphology operate with the new consonantal string in the normal way, making an originally triliteral root like warrada into a quadriliteral root warannada, which inflects just like an original quadriliteral such as marammara" (p.
Are these two forms cognate to one another, reflecting an otherwise lost quadriliteral root *[square root of (prm/nd)]?
137-43), gathering material from the Hinds and Badawi dictionary, examines some changes in Forms (Carter calls them Stems) III and X, and quadriliteral verbs.
And although it is indeed morphology that forms the backbone of this study, there are instances in which it is interrelated with semantics, as in the kinship between many quadriliteral verbs of Arabic origin and theme II of the triliterals and their nominal derivatives (see pp.
Probably entirely anomalous but occurring in the same context is Maltese ssa'sa, 'he asked', which is understandably listed as a quadriliteral but must derive from theme X of Arabic q-s-y, istaqsa - with the augmentative 's' annexed to the stem and the 't' dropped.
The dictionary that can claim the honor of having been the first reverse dist and thus provides no clue to show that quadriliterals roots all have a liquid (I or r) as the second of the four radicals.