quaestor

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quaes·tor

 (kwĕs′tər, kwē′stər)
n.
Any of various public officials in ancient Rome responsible for finance and administration in various areas of government and the military.

[Middle English questor, from Latin quaestor, from *quaestus, obsolete past participle of quaerere, to inquire.]

quaes·to′ri·al (kwĕ-stôr′ē-əl, kwē-) adj.
quaes′tor·ship′ n.

quaestor

(ˈkwiːstə; -tɔː) or

questor

n
1. (Law) any of several magistrates of ancient Rome, usually a financial administrator
2. (Historical Terms) any of several magistrates of ancient Rome, usually a financial administrator
[C14: from Latin, from quaerere to inquire]
quaestorial adj
ˈquaestorˌship n

quaes•tor

or ques•tor

(ˈkwɛs tər, ˈkwi stər)

n.
1. any of various public magistrates in ancient Rome with chiefly financial responsibilities.
2. one of two officials serving as public prosecutors in certain criminal cases in early Rome.
[1350–1400; < Latin quaes-, base of quaerere to seek]
quaes•to′ri•al (-ˈstɔr i əl, -ˈstoʊr-) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quaestor - any of several public officials of ancient Rome (usually in charge of finance and administration)
finance - the branch of economics that studies the management of money and other assets
functionary, official - a worker who holds or is invested with an office
Translations

quaestor

questor (US) [ˈkwiːstəʳ] Ncuestor m
References in periodicals archive ?
By the time Seneca traveled back to Rome in AD 31, his aunt had used her influence to get him a quaestorship, the first official "rank" for the young Roman elite, and a position that usually was granted only after 10 years of service in the army.
Vespasian's praetorship, coming a mere six years after his quaestorship.
As an individual aged he could expect to hold increasingly senior posts: the quaestorship at twenty-seven, praetorship in his late thirties and the consulship at forty-two.
He has transposed it by a little matter of twenty years from the setting given it by Suetonius and Dio, during Caesar's quaestorship in Spain in 69 B.